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Heat advisory issued for Trousdale County

The National Weather Service issued a heat advisory Thursday that will go into effect Friday for Trousdale and surrounding counties in Middle Tennessee.

Image courtesy of National Weather Service

The heat advisory will begin at noon and end at 7 p.m. Forecasters said heat index values are expected to be between 102-106 degrees and higher heat index values could spread east of Interstate 65.

According to forecasters, the combination of hot temperatures and high humidity could lead to an increased risk of heat-related stress and illness. Small children, the elderly, those without air conditioning and those participating in strenuous outdoor activities will be the most susceptible. Also, car interiors will reach lethal temperatures in a matter of minutes.

A heat advisory means that a period of hot temperatures is expected. The combination of hot temperatures and high humidity will combine to create a situation in which heat illnesses are possible.

Forecasters recommend people should drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room out of the sun and check up on relatives and neighbors.

Look Back: Lasting memorial to a mother’s love

Many Trousdale County men and women served in World War II, both as draftees and as volunteers. When we try to give numbers, it is tricky because some soldiers lived on the edge of our county or in one of our neighboring counties and are sometimes included with our county, the other county or both!

In the aftermath of the war, the local VFW (Veterans of Foreign Wars) Post 4842, published a small book. It was the service record of the “Men and Women of Hartsville, Tennessee and Community.”

The book lists 159 men and one woman (Martha Mae Freeman) who served from Trousdale County. It does, however, list a few fellows from World War I and a few men who are also included on the lists of neighboring counties. Likewise, Macon County’s list of inductees includes some Trousdale County men.

Submitted
In 1977, Eva Beal handed over her son’s leather flight jacket to Tennessee State Museum employee Steve Cox. Her son, Cortez Beal, had worn it during World War II.

Still, it is a significant number of people from such a small county as ourselves – and every county in every state gave equal or larger amounts of soldiers. It was a great upheaval in the social structure of every town, city and community in the country.

And tragically, some of those who served never returned home.

This week we write about Cortez Beal.

Beal is unique because not only is he remembered here, but he is also recognized by the state of Tennessee in a special way. Let me explain.

Cortez A. Beal grew up in Smith County and was the only child of Ben and Eva Beal. He was raised on a farm and had every intention of being a farmer himself. And he had a girlfriend. Cortez and his sweetheart made future plans and he had even purchased a bedroom suite. But a war got in the way.

In 1942, he boarded a bus and joined a group of other men to go to boot camp and training.

By 1944, Cortez was serving in the Pacific Theatre. He was part of the flight crew on a B-17 Flying Fortress bomber as the engineer. When his mother asked him what an engineer did on a bomber, Cortez told her, “If something goes wrong with the plane, you get out and fix it!”

On July 8, 1944, the crew of the Flying Fortress set out for Biak Island, off the coast of New Guinea. There were other men on board, for a total of 18.

Somewhere over the water, the plane went down.

There were no radio transmissions and the base reported that there were no enemy plans in the area. It just disappeared with all 18 men aboard.

A week later, Mr. and Mrs. Beal got a telegram from the Secretary of War. In part, it read “…YOUR SON STAFF SERGEANT CORTEZ A BEAL HAS BEEN REPORTED MISSING SINCE EIGHT JULY BETWEEN NEW GUINEA AND BIAK ISLAND…”

In the hopes that the plane might have crashed on an island or that survivors of a sea crash may have made it to a remote shore, efforts to find Cortez and the others lasted for a year.

No signs of the plane or the missing men were ever found.

One day a box arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Beal. It contained the personal possessions of Cortez Beal.

Now, the story takes a turn.

By the late 1970s, Eva Beal was a widow and was living in Trousdale County. Despite the eternal hope that a mother has that her son would return, she was 87 years old and had to do something with the box of her missing son’s effects – everything from his toothbrush to one of his leather flight uniforms.

So Eva Beal contacted the Tennessee State Museum in Nashville. The state was moving some items in the museum from the old War Memorial Building to the lower floors of the new Tennessee Performing Arts Center. Now that it had more space, it wanted to add to its collection, particularly its collection of war memorabilia.

They welcomed the items from Eva Beal.

Today, if you visit the old War Memorial Building, you will find a display with Cortez Beal’s name on it.

Among the many items and looking almost like new, you will see Sgt. Beal’s leather flight jacket.

And why does it look so pristine?

Because once a year, every year since Cortez’s disappearance, Eva Beal had taken the jacket and its matching trousers out of the box and oiled the leather to keep it supple and looking nice.

It was the least she could do for a son, an only child, who would never return from war – but who would never leave her heart.

Jack McCall: Life lessons learned in tobacco rows

I’ve spent some time traveling down rows of tobacco. In freshly plowed ground, I’ve struggled to keep my balance as I lugged a pressure sprayer filled with insecticide.

At other times, I’ve walked, almost leisurely, with a hoe in my hands as I looked for stubborn weeds or grass. Then again, I’ve walked briskly down the rows topping tobacco, trying my best to keep up with the torrid pace set by my late father.

He could take two rows at a time, topping with both hands, and never seem to slow down. And I have cut and spiked tobacco in rows that seemed to grow longer by the minute.

Across the Miles
Jack McCall

But my favorite recollections of tobacco rows were of the times when I was a small boy, probably 10 years old. That was a time when a boy was expected to help, but not to carry the full responsibility of an adult.

I remember the days before sucker control, the days before MH-30 and later, Royal MH-30. Anyone familiar with tobacco knows that three suckers appear in the top of a tobacco plant soon after it is topped (when the terminal bud is removed.) And when those three suckers are removed the plant will “sucker” from top to bottom.

As growth inhibitors, the MH-30 family of sucker control products; under proper conditions, brought sucker growth to a halt. But they also slowed the growth of the tobacco plant.

In the early days of sucker control products, my father felt he got the most growth from his tobacco if we removed the initial top suckers after topping before he applied MH-30. It meant more work, but it made for longer top leaves in the tobacco plants.

Needless to say, we pulled a lot of suckers in my growing-up years.

In the years prior to the arrival of MH-30, there were times when we were forced to pull suckers from top to bottom.

As a boy, I got the job of crawling down the row and pulling the bottom suckers. There is a world unto itself near the ground in a patch of mature tobacco.

Hidden under a canopy of big, broad, drooping tobacco leaves, you could barely see the sky. Except in the hottest weather, the ground was cool and moist, made more so by suckers removed in earlier days. Sometimes suckers, fading from green to pale yellow, almost covered the ground. It made for a smell unique to the tobacco world.

And then, there was the soil; deliciously soft and brown, giving up an occasional flint rock or arrowhead – soil that had a rich, clean smell about it. It was the kind of dirt that felt good in your hands as you rubbed off accumulated tobacco gum.

One year, after a prolonged dry spell, my father opted to prime one particular patch of tobacco. Down the rows my brothers and I went, removing the brown leaves from the bottom of each stalk of tobacco. As we worked along, we created piles of leaves at varying intervals.

Later, the leaves were picked up and moved to the tobacco barn for spreading out, or stringing up. That year, I was just the right size for the job. It was the only time I remember when working in tobacco was fun.

Of course, working in tall tobacco when you are a boy has another advantage. Because no one can see you, they don’t know exactly where you are. So you can slip in a little rest now and then. My brothers contended I was real good at taking breaks in tall tobacco. Of course, I accused them of the same.

Those were good days. A boy came out of the tobacco rows at quitting time with ground-in dirt on his knees and on the heels of his hands. Tired bodies make for the best sleep.

I learned many of life’s lessons down those tobacco rows.

Jones joins Key UMC as new pastor

Key United Methodist Church is pleased to welcome a new pastor, Rev. William Alan Jones.

Rev. Jones was born in Memphis, to Elds. Willie and Rutha Jones and is the eldest of three children. He studied accounting at the University of Memphis and then attended the American Baptist College in Nashville, where he graduated with honors in the spring of 1991 with a Bachelors of Arts in Biblical Studies.

Rev. Jones pursued his Masters of Divinity Degree from Vanderbilt University and graduated in the spring of 1995.

Rev. Jones has served as the Senior Pastor of Celebration of Life Church in Memphis, and New Life Presbyterian Church in Omaha, NE. Under his leadership both churches experienced spiritual and numerical growth. He received his appointment in June 2017 and he is now the Proud Pastor of Key United Methodist Church in Hartsville.

Rev. Jones has served as the primary teacher of inmates, director of children’s church, and director of Christian Education at various churches throughout his ministry in Nashville. He also founded and organized a 501(c)3 non-profit called Boys to Men After School Tutoring and Mentoring Program.

Rev. Jones is also an independent insurance agent/broker and is licensed in both health and life insurance.  For seven years, he and his wife, Jacqueline, have represented many insurance companies and assisted hundreds of clients to enroll in the best plans for their needs.

Rev. Jones is married to Jacqueline Mayfield Jones. They have one daughter, Alexis, and reside in Mt. Juliet. Rev. Jones enjoys music, sports, and family and truly has a heart to serve God and His people.

We welcome Rev. Jones and his family to Key UMC and the Hartsville Community.  Everyone is welcome to join us at Key UMC for praise and worship service on Sunday mornings at 9 a.m. The church is located at 314 W. Main St.

Kindergarten orientation planned for TCES parents

Trousdale County Elementary School invites all of this year’s kindergarten parents to attend the 2017-2018 Kindergarten Orientation. The orientation is scheduled for Tuesday, July 25 at 6 p.m. at the school.

Due to after-school construction, parents are requested to come to the Sam Beasley Road entrance to the school.

At the meeting the parents will have an opportunity to meet Principal Demetrice Badru, along with the teachers. They will learn about the kindergarten program, including guidelines for having a successful year. They will also have the opportunity to meet their child’s teacher one-on-one.

Attendance at the orientation is urged by Badru, who said, “This is really the best time for our new kindergarten parents to come out and learn more about our school, our expectations, and have a chance to meet our staff. We hope to answer everyone’s questions about starting school at this event.”

The orientation is planned for adults only, and parents are requested to not bring children to the event.

Water Board votes 3 percent raise to employees

Employees of the Hartsville/Trousdale Water-Sewer Utility District will receive a 3 percent raise in the next fiscal year after a vote by the Water Board during its June 28 meeting.

The vote to raise employees’ pay comes shortly after the County Commission passed a budget for county government for 2017-18, which gives county employees a 3 percent bonus instead of a raise.

“Since we’ve had a really good year and employees didn’t get a raise last year, it might be a good opportunity to do that,” Department General Manager Jerry Helm told the board. (EDITOR’S NOTE: Helm retited from his position, effective June 30).

Asked after the meeting why the Water Department could provide raises when the county did not, County Mayor Carroll Carman, who sits on the board, said, “It’s an enterprise fund; those funds are entirely separate. They’re not a line item on the county court at all. I do see a distinction.

“Should there be equity? I’d like to think the answer is yes, but in the real world sometimes it doesn’t work.”

According to the department’s financial report, the Water Department was showing a profit of $609,463 through the end of May. The profit allowed the department to purchase two new trucks and a backhoe, as well as fund roof repairs to the water plant.

Reach Chris Gregory at 615-374-3556 or cgregory@hartsvillevidette.com.

Chamber News: Thanks to all who made July 4 a great day

Hartsville celebrated its bicentennial, the Fourth of July and Music in the Park with a wonderful parade, followed by an afternoon and evening filled with great music, games and fireworks.

Our community not only turned out to celebrate but to volunteer their time and talents as well. Those who work behind the scenes often go unnoticed, but I’d like to offer my deepest appreciation for all of their efforts in making this day a huge success for everyone.

An event doesn’t happen without sponsors and I’d like to thank the following:

Natalie Knudsen

Citizens Bank

Wilson Bank & Trust

Tri-County Electric

Advanced Propane

Trousdale County Veterinary Clinic

Old Time Express

Masonic Lodge

VFW

American Legion

Razors Shave & Barbershop

PigPen BBQ

Please mark your calendars for these upcoming Chamber events:

Tuesday, July 18 – At 7:30 a.m., Citizens Bank will be hosting a Business Before Hours Event at its Hartsville location. Join us for a morning of networking and light refreshments. This is a great opportunity for all businesses and individuals to connect with new people, as well as old friends, and learn what’s happening in our community.

Saturday, July 22 – At 11 am, a ribbon cutting at the Community Pregnancy Center, 783 McMurry Blvd.

Tuesday, Aug. 1  – At noon will be the annual Chamber of Commerce meeting at the Community Center. The Chamber uses this event to recognize retiring board members, install new board members and take a look at the past year’s activities while highlighting events for the upcoming year. We also have a lot of fun with a live auction and plenty of door prizes. I hope you’ll join us and learn more about your Chamber of Commerce and what it has to offer. Lunch will be catered by Chef Earl Burnley, followed by a dessert buffet.

Thursday-Saturday, Aug. 3-5 – The Trousdale County Fair, featuring the Rode West Band on Thursday, Family Feud on Friday, cash giveaways, and much more.

Monday, Aug. 21 – The solar eclipse with viewing at the City Park. Glasses for viewing may be purchased through the Hartsville Rotary Club.

The Chamber still has available the limited edition prints commemorating Hartsville’s Bicentennial. To purchase yours please email hartsvilletrousdalecoc@gmail.com or phone 615-374-9243. Unframed prints are $15; framed prints are $25.

FSA deadline for risk coverage approaching

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Tennessee Farm Service Agency (FSA) Acting State Executive Director (SED) Tyeisha Samples reminds farmers and ranchers that they have until Aug. 1 to enroll in Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and/or Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs for the 2017 crop year.

These programs trigger financial protections for participating agricultural producers when market forces cause substantial drops in crop prices or revenues.

“Producers have already elected ARC or PLC, but to receive program benefits they must enroll for the 2017 crop year by signing a contract before the Aug. 1 deadline,” said Samples. “Please contact your local FSA office to schedule an appointment if you have not yet enrolled.”

Covered commodities under the programs include barley, canola, large and small chickpeas, corn, crambe, flaxseed, grain sorghum, lentils, mustard seed, oats, peanuts, dry peas, rapeseed, long grain rice, medium grain rice (which includes short grain and sweet rice), safflower seed, sesame, soybeans, sunflower seed and wheat.

For more program information, contact your local FSA office or visit fsa.usda.gov/arc-plc. To find your local FSA office, visit offices.usda.gov.

Guest View: Teens face tough choices in today’s world

Today’s teens are facing a complex and often complicated lifestyle that is made even more difficult by being confronted by tough choices, according to Nathan Miller, of the Cumberland Mental Health Center of Lebanon.

Miller said the choices teens make are many times influenced by the persuasion of peers, by emotions that confuse what choices are available, and by what circumstances may result from the choices they make.

While there are a number of topics that consume decision making by teens, perhaps there are none more important than the decisions they will make when confronted with having to make the choice of being a user of alcohol, illegal drugs, prescription drugs, or tobacco products, all of which can lead to issues of abuse and addiction.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more teens die from use of prescription drugs than heroin or cocaine combined; more high school seniors regularly choose to use marijuana over cigarettes; 60 percent of seniors don’t see regular use of marijuana as harmful; 60 percent of teens who get or take prescription drugs illegally get them from relatives or friends; by the eighth grade 28 percent of all adolescents have consumed alcohol, 15 percent have smoked cigarettes, and 16.5 percent have used marijuana; and about 50 percent of high school seniors don’t think it is harmful to try crack or cocaine once or twice.

The statistics and data provided are based on a national study but even so the threat remains very real here in Trousdale County.

As a parent, you should be attentive and be aware of certain signs that may be pointing to some form of substance abuse being practiced by your child. These indicators are not the final word that a youth may be using illegal substances but are certainly valid considerations.

You should watch for a change in behavioral patterns such as times of depression, emotional swings, being loud when it is not appropriate, being secretive or deceitful, having a new set of friends, locking doors, not returning home on time, and staying away from home more frequently.

You should also be aware of the smell of smoke or alcohol on your teen’s body or clothing, of missing prescription medications, of missing bottles of alcohol, and the appearance of butane lighters, matches, rolling papers and other items that may indicate the use of tobacco or drug products.

If you believe your child may need help or you want to find out more about this topic please feel call or contact Volunteer Behavioral Health Care System at 1-877-567-6051 or at vbhcs.org.

Cumberland Mental Health Center is a division of Volunteer Behavioral Health Care System, a 40-year-old nonprofit agency providing mental health services to 31 Tennessee counties.

Walgreens, Vanderbilt team to run health clinics

Walgreens and Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) have announced that a subsidiary of VUMC will operate and provide all clinical services at 14 retail health clinics within Walgreens stores across Middle Tennessee.

The announcement builds upon the continued relationship between Walgreens and Vanderbilt Health which has included infusion services provided throughout the Middle Tennessee market and pharmacy participation in VUMC’s clinically-integrated network.

The existing Healthcare Clinics at these locations are planned to transition to VUMC in November, and will be an extension of the Vanderbilt Health System.  The clinics will be known as Vanderbilt Health Clinic at Walgreens. Walgreens will continue to manage these clinic locations until the transition.

The locations include the Gallatin store at 585 Nashville Pike and the Lebanon store at 1303 West Main Street.

“We are pleased to announce this new collaborative relationship with Walgreens, which reflects the efforts of both our organizations to make high-quality health care services more accessible and coordinated for patients living throughout Middle Tennessee,” said C. Wright Pinson, MBA, M.D., deputy chief executive officer and chief health system officer for VUMC. “Walgreens is a widely recognized industry leader and we look forward to sharing with them our commitment to improve the health of those we serve.”

At these 14 locations throughout Middle Tennessee, patients will be able to see Vanderbilt Health clinicians seven days a week, including evenings, giving patients the option to access a variety of health care services without an appointment. Among the available services are laboratory tests and treatments for common conditions such as bronchitis, bladder infections, flu, nausea and vomiting, sinus issues, seasonal allergies, sore throat and minor wounds.

“This is a great opportunity for Walgreens to work even closer with Vanderbilt Health,” said Pat Carroll, M.D., chief medical officer for Walgreens Healthcare Clinics. “Today’s announcement demonstrates our ongoing commitment to collaborate with community health systems, like Vanderbilt Health, to offer convenient access to affordable healthcare services while helping to ensure a true continuum of care for our patients.”

Tennessee Tech ranked as state’s best value

MONEY has ranked Tennessee Tech as the top public college in Tennessee in its 2017 “Best Colleges for Your Money” listing. Tech was ranked third in the state overall.

“We are committed to providing students with a very high-quality education at an affordable cost,” said Phil Oldham, Tech’s president. “Rankings such as this demonstrate that we are successfully fulfilling this commitment.”

Nine schools, both public and private, from Tennessee made the rankings. Only Vanderbilt University and Rhodes College were ranked higher in the state. Tech is ranked No. 18 among public colleges in the South, and No. 40 overall in the South.

Data in the rankings shows that Tech has the second-highest early career earnings for graduates, and has the second lowest estimated price for 2017-2018.

The magazine says, “It’s tough to beat the value of a TTU degree. While not well known outside of Tennessee, within the state this public school has a reputation for offering a high-quality education equivalent to many private institutions.”

More than 700 colleges across the country that met MONEY’s criteria were ranked based on education quality, affordability and how students did after graduation. Tech’s overall ranking is No. 296. Other notable schools in Tennessee include the University of Tennessee–Knoxville (362) and Belmont University (691).

MONEY drew on the research and advice of dozens of the nation’s top experts on education quality, financing and value to develop this new analysis of more than 2,400 colleges and universities. A total of 711 of the nation’s best-performing colleges made up the magazine’s final list. Schools were ranked based on 27 factors in three categories: quality of education, affordability and outcomes.

Tennessee Tech, with an enrollment of over 10,000 students, offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees across nine schools and colleges: Agriculture and Human Ecology, Arts and Sciences, Business, Education, Engineering, Fine Arts, Graduate Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, and Nursing. It is no stranger to top rankings, receiving high marks from U.S. News & World Report, the Brookings Institute, the Princeton Review, Washington Monthly and Payscale.com.

Guest View: Door to solving America’s problems right in front of us

We will never figure out health care, Medicaid and most of our country’s issues until we learn how to enter and exit buildings.

For years now I have witnessed average America’s issue with doors.

Almost every day I will encounter someone who doesn’t understand how to open a door.  For example if I am entering a building that has a double door, one to enter and one to exit, someone inevitably will always exit the door I am entering while I am trying to enter the door. Instead of opening their door which would be the door on their right or my left, they stand staring at me as if I am supposed to stop and not enter through my door but hold my door open so they can exit from my door.

I believe in being courteous, but I can’t figure out why so many people want to be discourteous to me. I have a door to enter and they have a door to exit. I am opening my door and they simply can open their door to exit. Instead, time and again they stand as if they are incapable or just too lazy to open their own door and expect me to hold my door open for them to exit instead of me entering through my door.

I see this on the flip side. Often when exiting a building someone who should be entering from the door on the left will see me opening my door on the right and instead of entering through their door will stand as if they are incapable of opening their door and will just barge on through the door I have opened to exit.

This is all terribly uncouth and people need to learn to open their own door. Usually if someone is entering a building and they are right behind me I open the door and motion for them to go ahead in front of me. I feel that is the polite thing to do. If I am exiting a building I am happy to step aside and let someone who is right behind me go first or even the door for him or her. If someone opens the door for me I am grateful and thank him or her for the courtesy.

I just can’t understand people who barge through a door that someone else may have opened to enter or exit. They act as if it is their American right to be rude and crude to just come on through the door someone else has opened and that the person opening the door should just stand and hold it open for them.

Maybe you haven’t experienced this. I hope you aren’t one of these door offenders because it’s really inconsiderate of you if you are.

Some Americans have been taught that this is acceptable and is the American way to get ahead. Simply barge, push ahead, break line and do whatever is necessary. Manners, courtesy and politeness are old fashion. Often I find myself standing watching someone as they dart through the door I am entering or exiting because they simply did not want to open the other door. Usually I stand there and think, “Another idiot doesn’t know how to open a door,” as they dart through mine without even a thank you but an obvious expectation that someone is simply expected to hold the door open for them.

This kind of mindset may get you in the door or through the door but it’s as far as it will get you. It won’t get you invited to dinner and I wouldn’t want to hire anybody like this who conducts himself this way.

Don’t barge through the door when other people are coming through the door. Use your own door to enter or exit. This is why these doors are installed.

One of the first steps to solving many of America’s problems is learning how to enter and exit. After this it will all be downhill.

Glenn Mollette is a syndicated columnist and author of 12 books. He is read in all 50 states. Contact him at GMollette@aol.com.

Change in law affects drunk driving arrests

People accused of drunk driving in Tennessee no longer face additional charges if they refuse a blood alcohol test.

Tennessee lawmakers say they were forced to pass a new drunk driving law after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that implied-consent laws were unconstitutional, saying that states cannot criminalize a DUI suspect’s refusal to submit to a forensic test.

The new law took effect July 1 and has the group Mothers Against Drunk Driving charging that the rights of drunk drivers are being considered above those of victims.

Photo courtesy of pixabay.com

Phaedra Marriott-Olsen, an underage drinking specialist with MADD in Tennessee, is a survivor of an incident with a drunk driver.

“It comes down to this – that drunk driver made two choices,” she states. “The first choice he made was to drink, and the second choice he made was to drive – so, when it comes to drunk driving, the ability to be able to just find a shortcut out of it or an easy way to get out if it, is not what we need to be doing.”

Drivers in all 50 states can still have their licenses revoked for refusing to take a blood-alcohol test, but can’t face additional fines or jail time.

Marriott-Olsen is now wheelchair-bound and says that as a result of the incident that injured her, she faces ongoing medical problems.

“I live it every single day of my life,” she states. “Every time I look at my scars, every time I look at my wheelchair, every time I push myself up a hill, I’m reminded how a drunk driver changed my life in just one instant.”

Tennessee faced the potential loss of federal revenue if the state didn’t change its law. Currently, drivers must either give consent for a blood test, or a warrant must be obtained.

Nominations being accepted for P-16’s BEST Award

Nominations are now being accepted for the fifth annual BEST (Businesses Empowering Students and Teachers) Awards.

The North Central P-16 Council sponsors the contest. The Council is made up of area secondary school educators, higher education leaders, and business people and led by Volunteer State Community College.

The goal of P-16 is to promote the relationship between education and the value of work, develop a highly trained workforce, and create a culture of lifelong learning by positively impacting student success through awareness, advocacy, and action.

The BEST Award celebrates the accomplishments of community leaders and supporters, business owners, and entrepreneurs. It honors those who share knowledge and expertise, advocate, and foster student success in Pre-K through postsecondary education.

The Council will award five BEST Awards annually, one in each of the counties served by the North Central P-16 Council.

Public and private businesses or individuals who work for an employer in Macon, Robertson, Sumner, Trousdale and Wilson counties may be nominated or may self-nominate. The recipients of the BEST Awards will be recognized at the October North Central P-16 Council meeting.

The nomination deadline is Aug. 15. To nominate an individual, please visit volstate.edu/P16BestAward. For a printed copy of the nomination, please call 615-230-3355.

Community Calendar: July 19, 2017

POLICY: Information for the Community Calendar submitted in person, by mail or fax is due by noon Monday for publication. Items mailed should be typed or printed and sent to: Community Calendar, The Hartsville Vidette, 206 River St., Hartsville, TN 37074 or brought to the office during business hours. Free listing of nonprofit events, community club and government meetings. We reserve the right to reject or edit material. Include name and phone number in the event we have questions.

GOVERNMENT MEETINGS:

Thursday, July 20

6 p.m. – School Board

The Hartsville/Trousdale County School Board will hold its regular monthly meeting at the offices of the Board of Education, 103 Lock Six Rd.

7 p.m. – Parks & Recreation Committee

The Hartsville/Trousdale County Parks & Recreation Committee will meet in the downstairs courtroom of the courthouse.

Monday, July 24

7 p.m. – County Commission

The Hartsville/Trousdale County Commission will hold its regular monthly meeting in the upstairs courtroom of the courthouse. The second and third readings of the Urban Tax Levy will take place during the meeting.

Wednesday, July 26

10 a.m. – Water Board

The Hartsville/Trousdale County Water Board will hold its monthly meeting in the county mayor’s office, 328 Broadway.

Thursday, July 27

6 p.m. – Purchasing Oversight Committee

The Hartsville/Trousdale County Purchasing Oversight Committee will meet in the downstairs courtroom of the courthouse for the quarterly meeting.

OTHERS:

Trousdale County Fair

The Trousdale County Fair will be held Thursday-Saturday, Aug. 3-5, 2017 at Trousdale County High School. Events include a Thursday concert by Rode West, Family Feud, Cow Chip BINGO, cattle/sheep show, chicken show, LEGO contest, Tea with the Queen and much more! There will also be $1,000 in cash giveaways during this year’s fair! Fair catalogs, including categories for entries, are available at both Hartsville banks or at the UT Extension Office.

Head Start

Trousdale Pre-K/Mid-Cumberland Head Start is currently recruiting children for the 2017-18 program year. Early Head Start accepts infants and toddlers. Children must be under age 3 on Aug. 15, 2017. Trousdale Pre-K/Head Start accepts children age 4 by Aug. 15. These programs offer screenings in development, speech & language, dental, hearing, vision and a number of health-related issues. To find out how to enroll your child, call 615-374-9532 and speak with Theresa Raney or Shannon Brawner.

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers

Bursting with the rambunctious energy of the original MGM film, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers is all boisterous fun and romance that harkens back to the glory days of the movie musical. A truly rollicking adventure, which teaches that it takes a bride to turn seven unshaven, unkempt brothers into manly gentlemen and to turn desire into romance. Bring the entire family for a feel good fun night at Lebanon’s Capitol Theatre as Audience of One Productions Presents this remarkable Broadway Musical. Dates are July 21, 21, 22, 23, 25, 27, 28 and 29. Tickets are $13 for ages 3-5 and $20 for ages 5 and up.

Friends, Family & Community Day

Gravel Hill Missionary Baptist Church will be having its Friends, Family & Community Day, leading up to its pastor’s anniversary on Saturday, July 22, at Trey Park in Hartsville. Church will also be having its annual bake sale, featuring fish, spaghetti, BBQ plates, cakes, pies, etc. There will be games, kickball, badminton, horseshoes and more. We hope to see everyone there beginning at 10:30 a.m.!

Live in Livingston Concert

Livingston will hold the second show of its summer concert series on Saturday, July 22, headlined by farewell Angelina with supporting act Clearview. Concert is at 7 p.m. at Central Park, 140 S. Spring St., Livingston. Admission is free. Visit facebook.com/centralparklivingston/ for more information.

Musical Appreciation

Greater Beech Hill Missionary Baptist Church will hold a Musical Appreciation on Sunday, July 23 at 3 p.m., to recognize Sis. Pat Randolph’s service as choir/musical director. Everyone is invited.

Revival

East Main Missionary Baptist Church will hold revival services beginning Sunday, Aug. 6. Services will begin Sunday at 11 a.m. and nightly at 7:30 p.m. Bro. Kevin Graham and Bro. Kenneth Graham will be conducting the services. Everyone is welcome.

UT Extension Book Club

The Sumner County UT Extension Office in Gallatin will have its About Book club meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 6 from noon-1 p.m. The selected book is “Mrs. Mike” by Frederick Backman. Book club is open to all and meets the first Wednesday of every other month. For more information, call 615-452-1423.

Meals on Wheels

Meals on Wheels is looking for volunteer drivers to deliver meals to elderly within Hartsville city limits. Drivers especially needed on Fridays. Call Ruby, 615-374-3987.

American Legion

Attention all former military members! American Legion Post 56 of Trousdale County would like to invite you to come spend time with us and get information on the benefits the Legion has to offer. You served your country well, now let us know how the country and your community can help you! Call John LaFleur, 860-268-7303 for more information.

Adult Education

FREE GED/HiSET CLASSES! The Adult Learning Center holds adult education classes each Wednesday at the middle school. Call 615-374-1131 to schedule an appointment.

TROUSDALE SENIOR CENTER:

Thursday, July 20

12:30 p.m. – Riverboat Cruise (cost $16, lunch at Awe Daddy’s)

5 p.m. – AF Water Aerobics

Friday, July 21

9 a.m. – AFEP Exercise

10 a.m. – Tai Chi

11 a.m. – Yoga

Noon – Rook games

Noon – Family Feud Practice

Monday, July 24

10 a.m. – Wii Bowling

11:30 a.m. – Mystery Lunch

5 p.m. – AF Water Aerobics

Tuesday, July 25

9 a.m. – AFEP Exercise

9 a.m. – Manicure/Pedicure

10 a.m. – Yoga

11:30 a.m. – Current Events by Wilson Bank & Trust

Wednesday, July 26

9 a.m. – Line Dancing

11 a.m. – Chair Exercise

Noon – Rook games

1 p.m. – Bible Study

Sheriff’s Reports: July 19, 2017

Editor’s Note: The following are suspects booked in the Trousdale County jail during the specified timeframe. All persons charged are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

July 8

Trace Layne Johnson, 26, of Hartsville, was charged with failure to appear by Deputy Dillin Polston. No bond was set and General Sessions court date was set for July 14.

July 10

Larry Lester Steele, 54, of Bethpage, was charged with domestic assault by Deputy James Pattie. Bond was set for $1,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 28.

Photo courtesy of pixabay.com

James Clifford Hoey, 25, of Hartsville, was charged with probation violation by Deputy Troy Calhoun. No bond was set and General Sessions court date was set for July 28.

Dorothy Ann Gough, 56, of Hartsville, was charged with filing false report by Deputy Grant Cothron. Bond was set for $1,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 28.

July 11

Victoria Lynn Birdwell, 45, of Lafayette, was charged with probation violation by Deputy Troy Calhoun. No bond was set and General Sessions court date was set for Aug. 29.

Cynthia Dianne Conatser, 61, of Hartsville, was charged with Schedule II mfg/sale/del by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $7,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

Tara Cheyenne Conatser, 32, of Hartsville, was charged with mfg/del/sell controlled substance, counterfeit controlled substance by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $12,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

Jessica S. Fyke, 25, of Hartsville, was charged with meth mfg/del/sell/poss by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $5,000 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

Joseph Randall Meservy, 29, of Hartsville, was charged with Schedule II mfg/sale/del by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $3,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

Brianna Love Mitchell, 22, of Hartsville, was charged with Schedule II mfg/sale/del by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $3,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

John William Oldham, 70, of Hartsville, was charged with meth mfg/sale/del by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Oldham was released on his own recognizance and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

Julie Marie Sann, 35, of Hartsville, was charged with Schedule II mfg/sale/del by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $3,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

James Alan Scruggs, 28, of Hartsville, was charged with meth mfg/sale/del/poss by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $8,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

Janet Ann Scruggs, 46, of Hartsville, was charged with Schedule II mfg/sale/del by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $5,000 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

Brian Mitchell Summer, 27, of Hartsville, was charged with Schedule II mfg/sale/del by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $3,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

James Michael Summer, 33, of Hartsville, was charged with mfg/del/sell controlled substance, counterfeit controlled substance by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $10,000 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

Thomas Wayne Trammel, 45, of Hartsville, was charged with mfg/del/sell controlled substance, probation violation by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $7,500 and General Sessions court dates were set for July 14 and July 17.

Penny Lee Uselton, 57, of Hartsville, was charged with Schedule II mfg/sale/del by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $3,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

Jason Jerome Vetetoe, 34, of Hartsville, was charged with meth intent to mfr by DTF’s Brandon Gooch. Bond was set for $5,000 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

July 13

Trenton Lamar Berry, 30, of Hartsville, was charged with probation violation by Deputy James Pattie. Bond was set for $100 and General Sessions court date was set for Aug. 29.

Tara Cheynenne Conatser, 32, of Hartsville, was charged with probation violation by Deputy Wesley Taylor. No bond was set and General Sessions court date was set for July 14.

Brianna Love Mitchell, 22, of Hartsville, was charged with probation violation by Deputy Danny Johns. No bond was set and General Sessions court date was set for July 14.

Edgar Bryan Noble, 34, of Hartsville, was charged with aggravated domestic assault by Deputy James Pattie. Bond was set for $1,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 28.

July 14

Johnathan Kody Jamison, 25, of Castalian Springs, was charged with probation violation by Deputy Grant Cothron. No bond was set and General Sessions court date was set for July 28.

Jeffery Reed Linder, 36, of Castalian Springs, was charged with violation of community supervision by Deputy Troy Calhoun. Bond was set for $2,000 and General Sessions court date was set for July 28.

William Jermaine Mallory, 39, of Gallatin, was charged with probation violation by Deputy Troy Calhoun. Bond was set for $527 and General Sessions court date was set for July 28.

Cameron Mattew Sullivan, 28, of Hartsville, was charged with probation violation by Deputy Grant Cothron. No bond was set and General Sessions court date was set for Aug. 29.

July 15

Mark Anthony Barnhill, 30, of Gallatin, was charged with probation violation by Deputy Joseph Buehler. No bond was set and General Sessions court date was set for July 28.

Roger Dale Crawford, 65, of Red Boiling Springs, was charged with probation violation by Deputy Joseph Buehler. No bond was set and General Sessions court date was set for Aug. 29.

Christopher Shane Hix, 31, of Castalian Springs, was charged with DUI, aggravated assault, possession of firearm while intoxicated by Deputy Joseph Buehler. Bond was set for $20,000 and General Sessions court date was set for July 28.

Erik Clinton McGee, 29, of Hartsville, was charged with public intoxication by Deputy Joseph Buehler. Bond was set for $1,000 and General Sessions court date was set for July 28.

Misty Dawn Torres, 36, of Hartsville, was charged with del/sell controlled substance by Deputy Brad Basford. Bond was set for $3,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 17.

Brandon Tyler Travis, 20, of Goodlettsville, was charged with aggravated domestic assault by Deputy Jared Lake. Bond was set for $1,500 and General Sessions court date was set for July 28.

July 16

Gary Wayne Massingille, 34, of Hartsville, was charged with domestic assault by Deputy Jared Lake. No bond was set and General Sessions court date was set for July 28.

Willie Edward Ashford, 53, of Watertown, was charged with DUI, implied consent violation by THP Trooper Cothron. Bond was set for $4,000 and General Sessions court date was set for Sept. 22.

Look Back: Love for flying cost Lovelady his life

We are using the month of July to recognize some local men who served in World War II and made the ultimate sacrifice by giving their lives to keep our country free.

Almost 300,000 American servicemen and women lost their lives during a war that came only 20 years after World War I. That war, ironically, had been called “the war to end all wars!”

During WWII, Trousdale County had 18 Gold Star families. A Gold Star posted in the window of a home indicated that the family has lost a family member to the war.

Submitted
Josephine Lovelady, sister of Jack Lovelady, gave this family photo of her brother to the Historical Society that shows him in his sailor uniform. Jack was one of 18 Trousdale County men who died during World War II.

Our research (and please correct us if we are wrong) shows that the 18 Trousdale County men who died during the war were: Lewis Key, Charlie Scruggs, John Fisher, Jack Lovelady, James Dyer, Julian Seymore, Austin Smith, Richard Scoggins, Stanley Moore, Ottis Thomas, Leon Johns, James Cato, Cortez Beal, Charles Lee Burton, Wiseman Parkhurst, James Gregory, Aubrey Forkam and Vassie Coleman Burton. (EDITOR’S NOTE: The number was incorrectly reported as 20 in last week’s column that appeared in The Vidette.)

A few years ago through the efforts of Tommy Jones, the VFW and others, a nice marble monument was placed on Main Street to honor all of our county’s soldiers. The monument caused a bit of a stir at the time due to some names that were left off by accident and to how some were listed. Those mistakes were later corrected and today the monument sits proudly next to our new Community Center.

A soldier can be listed as “killed in action,” which means that they were killed in combat or as a result of warfare. However, soldiers can die in war-related activities but not actual combat. In that case, they may be listed as “killed in the line of duty.”

A few soldiers on the monument were listed as KIA when they had actually died as a result of accidents or illness during wartime service.

One of those names was that of Jack Lovelady.

Jack died during a flight mission over the Gulf of Mexico, not as a result of fighting but in line of duty.

Jack Lovelady was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lovelady, who lived on Harris Branch Road in Trousdale County. He had a sister, Josephine Lovelady.

Jack was assigned to the Naval Air Training Station in Kingsville, Texas. In February 1945, he was in one of four training planes that were sent out over the water in the Gulf of Mexico. Three of the planes returned to base – but Jack’s plane did not.

Immediately an aerial search was conducted, but no sign of the plane or its occupants was ever found.

As a result, Jack Lovelady was missing and presumed dead.

His death in the plane was unique because Jack was not part of the plane’s crew – he was a member of the ground crew.

A letter to the family from a member of Jack’s squadron explained. It said that Jack loved flying and looked for opportunities to be in the air. The letter also noted that Jack was well liked by his fellow sailors and in particular by his superior officers.

A consequence of his love for flying was that, during training missions and if he wasn’t on duty himself, Jack would ask if he could fly along. His character was such that he was welcomed to climb aboard and join the crew.

On the day of the accident, he had again asked if he could join his friends and fellow sailors and had been given the OK to do so – with tragic results.

According to the investigation, the plane with Jack aboard took off from the base with the others, but was never seen again.

There was no contact with the base, no distress signal or any indication of engine trouble. But it was the conclusion of a Board of Inquiry that the plane had probably encountered mechanical problems and gone down in the Gulf.

Seaman Second Class Jack Lovelady’s parents became a Gold Star family. Due to the circumstances of his death, Jack Lovelady’s family erected a monument in the Green Grove Cemetery as a memorial – a memorial over an empty grave.

Jack McCall: Time really flies at 83 mph

I was returning from East Tennessee awhile back by way of U.S. Interstate 40.  In reasonably heavy traffic, somewhere on the east side of Crossville, I grew tired of this dude who had been dogging my back bumper for over a mile. Boxed in by a motorist in front of me who seemed to be in no hurry, along with a steam of tractor-trailer rigs in the right-hand lane, I found it impossible to let the eager driver who was following get by.

Finally, I was given an opening and I pressed the accelerator. I found it necessary to pass a half-dozen tractor-trailers before I could ease into the right lane. By the time I had overtaken the last one, I had built up a considerable amount of speed. Glancing at my speedometer, I realized I was doing 80 mph. At the same moment I noticed I had just crossed the Putnam County line.

Across the Miles
Jack McCall

That combination of speed and location took me back in time 45 years or so. It was 1971.

On a beautifully sunny Sunday afternoon, my girlfriend (her name will remain undisclosed) and I were on our way back to the University of Tennessee and Knoxville. I was driving a 1968 Chevelle Malibu. It was equipped with Indy Drag “Mag” wheels, air shocks and over-sized, wide rear tires.

Just beyond Cookeville, I spotted a radar “tri-pod” just ahead on the shoulder of the interstate. I turned to my female passenger who was sitting right next to me on the console between the bucket seats. Back in those days, your “honey” sat on a pillow on the console as close to you as she could get. It was part of a ritual called “courtship,” lost to most young people today. Since she was sitting higher than me I had to look up into her eyes.

“How fast am I going?” I quickly asked.

We both looked at the speedometer.

“Seventy-six!” she answered.

I smiled and nodded in agreement as I felt a sense of relief.

The next thing I knew a Tennessee State Trooper had stepped out into the right lane of the interstate, and was motioning me off the road.

As I handed my license to the officer, I asked, “How fast did you clock me?”

“You were doing 83 miles per hour, sir,” he replied.

“That can’t be!’ I protested. “My speedometer read 76.”

“I can only go by what my radar device recorded, sir,” he said, flatly. “You will have to take that up with the judge. In the meantime, I suggest you slow down.”

With that said, he turned and walked away.

To quote one of my late mother’s phrases, I was “not going to be outdone.”

In those days, the Putnam County stretch of I-40 was a notorious speed trap. It was made more notorious because of the county judge, Judge Barrett. He was well known for being hard-nosed and unyielding. I had my work cut out for me.

On Monday morning, I began looking for an outfit that could check my speedometer for accuracy. I found such a place in R.T. Clapp and Company. I scheduled an appointment for the next day. After analyzing the situation, the technician informed me that my speedometer was registering 10 percent slow. He explained the over-sized rear tires were causing the problem.

I took my receipt and the documented findings and composed a letter to Judge Barrett.

In the letter I listed a number of reasons why I would not have been intentionally speeding in Judge Barrett’s jurisdiction. Among them, I explained I was a poor boy working my way through college (which was true), and I made a sincere effort to operate within the bounds of the law.

Ten days later I received a letter from Judge Barrett. The letter read thusly:

“Dear Mr. McCall:

The fact you are a poor boy working your way through school has no bearing on the fact you were breaking the law by driving over the speed limit.” (I began to have this sinking feeling as I read. Then I saw the word “however.”) However was the word I was hoping for!

The letter continued, “However, since you have made the effort to correct your faulty speedometer and have shown proof thereof, I am placing your case on the retired docket. You are no longer subject to paying any fines in this case.”

In all my college days, it was one of my finest moments.

Two years later, on a glorious Monday morning I was headed back to Knoxville. My girlfriend and I had long since parted company.

Preoccupied with the events of the day that lay ahead, the last thing on my mind was a radar trap – until I saw that tri-pod…again. The instant I spotted it, I hit my right blinker as I glanced at my corrected speedometer. The needle was sitting on 83. The state trooper was laughing as I pulled off the road in front of him.

“Sorry, sir. In a hurry this morning,” I offered. He never stopped writing.

The next morning I mailed a check in care of Judge Barrett’s court.

Wilson Bank named Top Workplace for third time in row

For the third year in a row, Wilson Bank & Trust has been recognized as one of the top workplaces in Middle Tennessee.

Sponsored by The Tennessean, the Top Workplaces award is based on the results of an employee feedback survey administered by WorkplaceDynamics, LLC, a leading research firm that specializes in organizational health and workplace improvement.

Wilson Bank & Trust ranked third in the category for large companies based on 2017 survey scores and has finished in the top five in each of the past three years. A faith-based, family-friendly culture was once again a major factor cited in the employee feedback that led to WB&T’s award.

Submitted
A number of Wilson Bank & Trust employees were on hand at a recent banquet where the bank received a 2017 Top Workplace award from The Tennessean. The honor is based on the results of an independent employee survey administered by WorkplaceDynamics. WB&T ranked third in the category for large companies.

“We believe a great customer experience starts with a happy and engaged team,” WB&T Executive Vice President John McDearman said.  “Our employees take pride in having a service-first attitude and making a difference in the communities we serve, and those are qualities that our customers recognize and truly appreciate.”

Several aspects of workplace culture are measured in the survey, including alignment, execution, and connection, to name a few.

While promoting a family atmosphere at work and in the communities it serves, the bank also strives to ensure that employees have competitive benefits to keep their families thriving. Benefits at WB&T include health insurance, up to four weeks of vacation time depending on tenure, personal days and a 401(k) plan.

A complete list of The Tennessean’s Top Workplaces can be found at TopWorkplaces.Tennessean.com.

Wilson Bank & Trust (wilsonbank.com), a member of the FDIC and an Equal Housing Lender, currently operates 26 full-service offices in eight Middle Tennessee counties, offering a full range of financial products that include secondary market mortgage loans and online banking services.

WorkplaceDynamics, headquartered in Exton, PA, specializes in employee feedback surveys and workplace improvement. This year alone, more than two million employees in over 6,000 organizations will participate in the Top Workplaces™ campaign, conducted in partnership with more than 40 media partners across the United States.

TCAT Hartsville recognizes graduates

TCAT Hartsville wishes to recognize the following recent graduates:

James Anderson of Lebanon recently graduated from the Welding Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Combination Welder diploma. Anderson is currently employed with Shiroki North America in Gordonsville, as a welder.

Charles Brown of Lebanon recently graduated from the Machine Tool Technology program at at TCAT Hartsville and received a Machinist I diploma. Brown is currently employed with Pro-Tech Tool in Lebanon.

Joseph Byrnes of Carthage recently graduated from the Machine Tool Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Machinist I diploma. Byrnes is currently employed with Shiroki-North America in Gordonsville, as a tool and die repair technician.

Calvin Choquet of Westmoreland recently graduated from the Machine Tool Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Machinist I diploma.

Ethan Claridy of Hartsville recently graduated from the Industrial Maintenance program at TCAT Hartsville and received an Industrial Maintenance Technician Diploma. Claridy was employed with West Rock in Lebanon, as a maintenance technician.

Joshua Ethan Copas of Lebanon recently graduated from the Industrial Maintenance program at TCAT Hartsville and received an Industrial Maintenance Technician diploma. Copas is currently employed with Demo’s Restaurant in Lebanon.

Hayley Crook of Westmoreland recently graduated from the Administrative Office Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Medical Administrative Assistant Diploma. Crook is currently employed with Silver Angels in Westmoreland.

Kelsey Dickens of Hartsville recently graduated from the Administrative Office Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received an Administrative Assistant Diploma. Dickens is currently employed with Brenda’s Restaurant in Carthage.

Terry Gwynn of Lebanon recently graduated from the Administrative Office Technology Online program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Medical Administrative Assistant diploma. Gwynn is currently employed with STM Master Seal in Lebanon.

Criston Hackett of Hickman recently graduated from the Administrative Office Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received an Administrative Assistant diploma. Hackett is currently employed with Dollar General in Carthage.

Brian Hawkins of Hartsville recently graduated from the Industrial Maintenance program at TCAT Hartsville and received an Industrial Maintenance Technician diploma. Hawkins is currently employed as a maintenance technician with ARC Automotive in Hartsville.

Michael Taylor Jenkins of Bethpage recently graduated from the Machine Tool Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Machinist I diploma. Jenkins is currently employed with Wilmore Tool and Die in Gallatin, as an apprentice toolmaker.

Ben Johnson of Lebanon recently graduated from the Computer Information Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Desktop Technician certificate.

Adam Oldham of Castalian Springs recently graduated from the Machine Tool Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Machinist I diploma. Oldham is currently employed with Standard Machine in Hendersonville, as a machinist.

Daryl Roskam of Lebanon recently graduated from the Machine Tool Technology Program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Machinist I diploma. Roskam is currently employed with Barrett Firearms in Christiana, as a CNC Machinist.

Ryan Simmons of Portland recently graduated from the Machine Tool Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Machinist I diploma. Simmons is currently employed with Diemasters in Portland, as a toolmaker.

Hayden Waggoner of Carthage,recently graduated from the Industrial Maintenance program at TCAT Hartsville and received an Industrial Maintenance Technician diploma. Waggoner is employed with Shiroki –GT, LLC, in Gordonsville, as a maintenance technician.

Roger Wills of Hendersonville recently graduated from the Machine Tool Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Machinist I diploma. Wills is currently employed with Day Enterprise in Goodlettsville, as a machininst.

Nicholas Winslow of Lebanon recently graduated from the Machine Tool Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Machinist I diploma. Winslow is currently employed with the Wilson County Sheriff’s Office in Lebanon, as a deputy.

Cole Yarbrough of Elmwood recently graduated from the Welding Technology program at TCAT Hartsville and received a Combination Welder Diploma. Yarbrough is currently employed with Mueller Refrigeration Products in Hartsville, as a welder.