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Celebrating an old fashion Christmas

Candles were lit and garland hung with care, as vocalist and musicians filled the air with delightful noise as strong winds bellowed outside the small one room church Saturday night.
With temperatures in the 70s and threats of possible tornadoes Dec. 21, it would be hard to believe that a Christmas celebration would be happening, but despite the weather folks showed up in droves for the annual Dixon Springs’ old fashioned Christmas at the century old Union Church.
“We did talk about the possibility of storms,” said Lucy Oldham, member of the Dixon Springs Preservation Association, “but it didn’t seem to bother those who come out each year.”
The event has a bit of a cult following, with some coming in from other states to attend.
“It is so much fun,” said Fran Cutrell Rutkovsky, with her husband Paul, who traveled from Florida. “I like all the mixture of people, and seeing the programs. It’s always different programs.”
Rutkovsky added that for her Dixon Springs is still home despite living in Florida, and they make the pilgrimage to attend the annual celebration each year.
Jason Hollman along with his children Cecilia, 6, and Walter, 4, attended the event for the first time.
“We have a family farm near by, and we were visiting family. After hearing about this event, we decided to continue our Christmas festivities over here,” said Hollman.
Each year the celebration features different local musicians and vocalists from Trousdale and Smith Counties. This year’s program featured Lynn Sharenberger; Les McDonald; a youth choir directed by Sharenberger; Vivian Reynolds Penfield Family and sons; and Greta and Bro. Glenn Kirby.
Dixon Springs Preservation Association member John Oliver read “The Night Before Christmas,” and Bill Allen read “The Christmas Story” from The Bible.
In years’ past musical groups included choirs from various churches and a Latin choir.
“This was the best ever,” said Oldham. “It is a thrill to see everyone every year, and this year we have a lot of new faces.
“This event seems to get a little bigger each year, and we would like local residents to come out to the various events that happen at the church.”
The annual celebration started in 1990 as a fundraiser for the Dixon Springs Preservation Association.
Oldham added that at the 25th celebration in two years, the group hopes they will be able to have a “big shebang” in honor of the work the preservation association has done.
Managing Editor Marie Corhern can be reached at 615-374-3556 or email mcorhern@hartsvillevidette.com.

Kids see an early Christmas

Nearly 200 children are having a merrier Christmas this year thanks to the Trousdale County Christmas for Kids program.
The annual program held at Hartsville Church of Christ takes donations of toys and clothing to help children in need during the holidays. Each child visits the Fellowship Hall at the church to pick out a few toys of their choice and then they are given a bag that is filled with a pair of shoes, pants, a shirt and a coat, that are all purchased using donated funds.
“We spend approximately $150 per child,” said coordinator Jennifer Claridy.
Following their selection of goodies from the donated toys, each child is given a gift certificate to go shopping and purchase addition items.
“Volunteers take the kids shopping, we encourage the parents not to go because sometimes the kids will buy the parents gifts with their certificates,” Claridy said.
Claridy said each participant was given $30 to spend while shopping, which is up from last year’s $25.
“This would not be possible without the generosity of the people in this county. I think it is amazing that a little town like Hartsville can [donate] like this,” she added.

Come Home for Christmas

 

It might have been cold and rainy, but nothing dampen the spirits of citizens of Trousdale County Dec. 14 as it held it’s annual Christmas parade.

This year’s parade had close to 200 entries from beauty pageant winners to scouts, to veterans to antique cars and everything in between. The Grand Marshals for the 2013 parade were Bill Holder, Ed Martin and John Martin.

The theme was “Come Home for Christmas,” and the winners were: 

Grand Prize – Bill Scruggs family; best float – Citizens Bank; best Christmas theme entry – Trousdale Medical Center; best pet entry – Dames For Danes; best horse drawn entry – Driver Farms; best commercial entry – Red Hat Ladies; best church entry – Rocky Creek Fellowship Church; best kids entry – Youth Football 6 and 7-year-olds; best motorcycle entry – Don Burnley; best tractor entry – Royce Belcher; best truck entry – JImmy Shrum; best antique car – Thomas Baird and best modified car – Seed Morton.

Managing Editor Marie Corhern can be reached at 615-374-3556 or email mcorhern@hartsvillevidette.com.

Christmas is up and running in Tennessee

 

The holiday season is in full swing here at the Capitol in Nashville.

We kicked it off just after Thanksgiving with the annual lighting of the Christmas tree, a 30-foot Norway spruce from the University of Tennessee’s Institute of Agriculture’s Cumberland Forest near Oliver Springs. The tree included a three-foot star on top, approximately 6,000 bulbs and more than 200 ornaments.

We were joined again this year at War Memorial Plaza by Santa Claus and Mrs. Claus, and we were treated to entertainment by the 129th Army Band and multi-platinum-selling Curb Records recording artist Lee Brice.  We had carriage rides, popcorn, hot chocolate and apple cider.  Crissy and I joined Santa and Mrs. Claus to read “’Twas the Night Before Christmas” for children, which is always a highlight for us.

The following night, I was joined by Rabbi Yitzchok Tiechtel, members of Chabad from across the state and children from the Akiva School of Nashville to light the Capitol menorah to mark the second to last night of Chanukah, which fell early this year.

We have also been hosting the annual open house at the Tennessee Residence.  The theme for this year’s decorations is “Tennessee Legends,” to celebrate our state’s history.  The decorations showcase influential people, places and events throughout Tennessee’s rich past. They include trees and displays featuring Andrew Jackson, Sequoyah, Davy Crockett, Tennessee’s governors and more recent legends like Pat Summitt and Dolly Parton.

Through partnerships with the Tennessee State Museum, the Hermitage, the Davy Crockett Birthplace State Park, the East Tennessee Historical Museum and the Sequoyah Birthplace Museum, we have some very special artifacts on display.

While tours of the Residence are given year-round, it’s a lot of fun to have so many visitors come for the holidays.  Over the past two years, nearly 10,000 people have attended these open houses.

From Memphis to Mountain City, this is a great time of year to be in Tennessee.  Our state has so much to offer. 

The holidays are a time to reflect on our many blessings and to spend time with family and friends.  In the Volunteer State, we understand the meaning of helping others, and Tennesseans often do a lot of work to help those in need this time of year. 

We are especially grateful to the brave men and women serving our state and our nation around the world.  We know that they are often far from home and away from their families over the holidays, and we appreciate their sacrifice.

Crissy and I hope you have a very Merry Christmas and best wishes for a Happy New Year.

Christmas trees of yesteryear

 

How did people celebrate Christmas in the past?

That is our subject this month. Last week we saw how children long ago hung their stockings on the fireplace mantel and how, on Christmas morning, they would be delighted to find them stuffed with fruit, nuts and hard candies.

This week we look at Christmas trees.

We know the first pioneers thought little of holidays. They were too busy carving a home out of the wilderness.

But, as Middle Tennessee became more settled and a little more civilized, people began to set aside Sundays as a day for worship and religious holidays were observed.

Alabama was the first state to declare Christmas a legal holiday and that was in 1836!

At that time, however, celebrating Christmas meant meeting at the local church for a service and singing. Decorations were there…but not the festive ornaments we have today. 

Branches of evergreen were brought into the church or home.

Notice, I said “branches” of evergreen…not “trees!”

A decorated tree was a long tradition in the Germanic countries of Europe, but not here.

Historians credit the popularity of England’s Queen Victoria with the Christmas tree’s arrival on the American scene.

When pictures of the Queen and her family around a small tree were published in American newspapers and magazines it suddenly became the “in” thing to do.

That was in the mid 1800s.

By the 1870s Christmas trees were common across our country. And, while the Queen had only a table top tree, it was Americans who insisted on having floor to ceiling trees!

Still, the trees people had in Hartsville 100 years ago were not like those we use today.

If you had a tree, it was a cedar tree you cut off the side of a hill and you put it up on Christmas eve and you took it down on Jan. 7, the day after “Epiphany” (the traditional day when the wise men appeared before the Christ child).

The only artificial trees were small ones made of feathers dyed green!

And, the decorations didn’t come from the Hallmark store made of plastic and resin!

Let’s look at what the late Ruby Stone wrote about Christmas around 1905: “We never had a Christmas tree at home in my early days. We had a large tree at the church…they would meet to decorate it with different sized tissue paper bells that opened out. We would string popcorn and make green and red paper chains for the tree. Later we had tinsel ropes to put on the tree.”

Popcorn was definitely the most popular decoration.

Virginia Winston Foley told her family, “Christmas was the favorite time of the year for my three sisters and me. We loved everything about it. Chopping down a cedar tree in the woods and decorating it with garlands of popcorn!”

In an article printed in the Vidette in the 1970s, Lucie Clayborne had this to say, “…we rarely ever went to Grandmother’s. It was too far and we had to go in a wagon.” But, she went on to say, that didn’t keep Christmas from being special as they decorated the family tree with “popcorn and holly berries and cutting our paper snowflakes.”

In the same article, Vyda Mae Draper Thompson said, “Mother would cut out large gaps in the branches of the tree and then clip real candles in the spaces for a picture perfect Christmas tree.”

Vyda Mae’s brother, the late Brown Draper, added, “By all safety standards today, we should have all burned up!”

Vyda Mae then finished her interview with this recollection, “The tree was decorated with ornaments our Grandmother made from crochet spools, as well as paper cones full of candy and nuts.”

What would people from the past think of what we have today?

Sharing the Christmas Spirit

 

It was great to see all the smiling faces lining the streets and gathered at the courthouse for the horse-drawn delivery of the Trousdale County Christmas tree. The beautiful decorations at the courthouse and the Christmas tree bring a very festive feel to downtown Hartsville.

Speaking of people lining the streets, we hope everyone will turn out for the annual Christmas parade this Saturday, Dec. 14, beginning at 10 a.m. The theme “Come Home for Christmas” is a reminder of the importance of community, friends and family during the holiday season. This year’s parade is shaping up to be one of the largest in recent memory with plenty of local participation. The parade line-up is listed in today’s Vidette.

Everyone is invited to gather at the courthouse immediately following the parade for the presentation of trophies to the winning entries. Free coffee and hot chocolate will be provided by the Hartsville/Trousdale County Chamber of Commerce. Food will also be available for purchase. Please contact the chamber at 615-374-9243 for more information.

You can also share the Christmas Spirit by donating to Christmas for Kids and the Community Help Center. Christmas for Kids will serve more than 200 local children ages 3 to 15 years this holiday season. Christmas for Kids provides gifts for Trousdale County children who might not otherwise have much of a Christmas celebration.

The Community Help Center is also in need of monetary, food, clothing and furniture donations to serve those in need in our county. For more information please contact the Help Center at 374-2904. Store hours are Monday and Thursday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

The Living History Museum will be celebrating the Christmas season! Volunteers are decorating the house and making it available for tours again this year. Individuals, organizations and church groups are welcome to schedule a time to tour the house, learn its history and enjoy hot cider and cookies. Please contact the chamber at 615-374-9243 to reserve your tour.

Citizens Bank will be hosting the St. Thomas Susan G. Komen Mobile Mammography Unit at the Bank for a repeat visit on Dec. 13. For more information please contact Tracy Belcher, Citizens Bank, at 615-374-2265. Mammograms are offered on a walk-up basis and financial assistance is available.

The EAO Fundraiser will begin at 1 p.m. on Dec. 14, and feature concessions and vendors at the Trousdale County Elementary School.

Congratulations to all the talented and dedicated players, coaches and staff for bringing home the 2013 State Football Championship. Go Jackets!

Annual Christmas parade line-up

 

We are only days a way from Hartsville’s annual Christmas Parade. This year’s parade is Dec. 14 at 10 a.m. following the tradition parade route.

This year’s line-up includes:

1. Sheriff Ray Russell

2. Color Guard – National Guard

3. Grand Marshalls – Bill Holder, Ed Martin and John Martin

4. National Guard vehicle

5-6. VFW Post

7-8. American Legion

9. State Rep. Terri Lynn Weaver

10. State Sen. Ferrell Haile

11-12. Shriners 

13. Trousdale County Mayor Jake West

14. Chancellor CK Smith

15. Snow Bird

16-17. Hartsville/Trousdale County Chamber of Commerce

18-21. TCHS Marching Band

22-23 Boy Scouts Troop #900

24-26. Red Hat Society

28-29. Citizens Bank

30-31. World Classic Martial Arts

32-33. Haley’s Hearts Foundation

34. Dames for Danes

35. Reliable Pest Control

36-37. Trousdale County Help Center

38-39. Van Loo’s Traveling Boutique

40-41. Superintendent of Roads Bill Scruggs

42-43. Hartsville Twirlers

44-45. Trail Life USA

46-49. Trousdale Medical Center

50-51. Trousdale Family Practice

52-53. Hartsville Church of Christ

54. Library Teen Advisory Group

55. Cash Express

56-57. Cub Scouts Pack #122

58-59. Pineview Boarding Home

60-61. Ward School Preservation Association

62. Choice One Insurance

63. L&T Early Bird Café

64-65. WTNK

66-67. Webbtown Propane

68-69. Hartsville Dance Studio

70-71. Greater Beach Hill Church

72-73. McDonalds

74-75. Trousdale Bank & Trust

76. SMILE

77-78. Daily’s

79-80. Hartsville Masonic Lodge 361

81. S&S Motors

82-83. Macon County Senior Center Float

84-85. Rocky Creek Fellowship Church

86. Trousdale Senior Living

87. EAO Foundation & Team Mighty Max

88-89. 6 & 7 year old youth football & cheerleaders

90-91. 8 & 9 year old youth football & cheerleaders

92-93. 10 & 11 year old youth football & cheerleaders

94-96. TCHS Football Team

97. Football Homecoming Queen Morgan Fisher

98. Breanna Calhoun & Brooke Sheehan – Senior & Sophomore Football attendants

99. Destinee Dixon – Junior football attendant and third runner-up Miss Trousdale

100. Taylor Simmons – Freshman football attendants

101. Miss Trousdale & Court

102. JSMS Football Queen Baylee Huffines and JSMS Basketball Queen Shelby Vaughn

103. JSMS Cheerleaders

104. Chrissa Howard – Junior Miss Trousdale

105. Southern Dixie Dolls Beauty Pageant

106. Crista Shockley – Miss Trousdale Elementary

107. Madison Rolin – Little Miss Trousdale

108. Braylee Potts – Little Miss Queen and Mileigh Potts – second runner-up Little Miss Princess

109. Lila Pope – Little Miss Princess

110. Camdin Marr – Little Mr. Tiny Tot

111. Anna Gregory – Little Miss Tiny Tot

112. Talon Pride – Little Mr. Darling

113. Paisley Kate Rolin – Little Miss Darling

114. PenniLayne Butcher – Little Miss Sweetheart

115. Thomas Adkins – Custom Suburban

116. Wayne Knight – Tow Mater

117. Chevell Club – Claude Hailey

118. Joey Sisco – ’69 Plymouth Road Runner

119. Tom Bell – ’75 Dodge Dart

120. Tom Loftis – ’70 Chevy Monte Carlo

121. Sanders Lackey – 1985 Lincoln Continental Car

122. Phillip Snow – 1944 MB Willis Jeep

123. Walter Locke – 1994 Corvette

124. Randall Blair – ’65 Chevy Impala

125. Jackie Kelley Jr.

126. Harry McCarl – 1975 MGB

127. Raymond Woodard – 1967 Ford Mustang

128. Joe Morgan – 1971 Chevelle

129. Seed Morton – 1964 Chevy Nova SS

130. Ray Worley – 1972 Chevy Truck

131. Jimmy Shrum – 1954 Chevy Truck

132. Roy Shrum – 1987 Buick GS

133. Tammy Shrum – 1968 Chevy Nova

134. Travis Smith – 1969 Chevy Nova

135. Ronnie Givens – 1969 Camaro

136. Ron Johnson – 1946 International

137. Isaac Boles – 1964 Chevy Truck

138. Danny Halliburton – 1968 Chevy Impala

139. Thomas Biard – 1936 Chevy

140. Randell Blair – 1988 Chevy Truck

141. Tony Spears – 1948 Jeepster

142. Allen Wall – 1996 S-10 Step-side

143. Jason Ray – 1984 Monte Carlo

144. Mike Deason – 1968 Chevelle

145. Howard Moss – 1998 Chevy Truck SS

146. David Moss – 1993 Chevy Truck

147. Roger Ray – 1966 Chevy Truck

148. Don and Elliott Schlaf – Termite Express

149-150. Wilson Co Motors

151-152. Bates Ford

153. Jordan White – tractor

154. Brandon Powell – 1936 JD tractor

155-156. Royce Belcher – tractors

157-158. David Everett – antique JD tractor

159. Howard Hauskins – antique JD tractor

160. Hannah Jones – JD tractor

161. Trousdale County Ambulance Service

162-164. Hartsville/Trousdale Fire Department

165-166. Hartsville Resque Squad

167-168. Lafayette Fire Department

169-170. Lafayette Rescue Squad

171-172. Dotson – 100 ft. platform ladder truck

173-174. Old Time Express

175. Jeremy Belcher – Semi

176. AB Harper Services and Family – Corey Harper

177. Stetson White and Casey Mangrum

178. Don Burnley

179. Curt McGowan

180. Terry Woodard

181. Danny Joe and Judy Gregory

182. Driver Farms 

183-185. Bullwhip Rodeo Productions

186-187. Darrell Jones

188. Santa

Annual country ham breakfast Saturday

 

This Saturday the men of the Hartsville First United Methodist Church will host their annual country ham breakfast from 7 – 10 a.m. The event is a fundraiser for the church’s men’s group.

The breakfast will be held in the basement of the church at 224 River Street.

Saturday’s menu includes: country ham, red eye gravy, sausage, cream gravy, scrambled eggs, hash browns, grits, fruit compote, biscuits, homemade preserves, juice and coffee.

All of this can be had for the low price of $5.

The men of the church will do all the food preparation and the cooking. Several of the older men of the church have been doing this for several years and are now training the younger men in the fine art of cooking county ham and making red eye gravy. 

So, the church kitchen will be packed with men of all ages baking biscuits, frying sausage and gently turning country ham over in the skillet.

Since this is also the morning of the annual Christmas parade, this will be a good place to get your day started and will help the men raise money for several service projects.

Jewell 100 percent certified by International Code Council

 

One hundred percent of Hartsville/Trousdale County Zoning and Building Inspectors staff has earned professional certification from the International Code Council (ICC). 

Through rigorous testing, ICC Certifications ensure that staff have demonstrated competency in the requirements of the International Codes, a complete set of comprehensive, coordinated codes used in most U.S. communities and many global markets for the set of comprehensive, coordinated codes used in most U.S. communities and many global markets for the design, build and compliance process to construct safe, sustainable, affordable and resilient structures.

The Code Council’s certification program is the oldest, largest and most prestigious credentialing program for construction code administration and enforcement professionals in the United States. Trousdale County’s Dwight Jewell earned the 100 percent designation through the “Get Everyone Certified Challenge” presented by ICC and Target, which is committed to building strong, safe communities and promoting education. Partnering with the Code Council to promote code knowledge is an obvious blending of these two initiatives. 

ICC Certification also demonstrates expert knowledge by staff and can assist in the department’s future efforts to become accredited by the International Accreditation Service. In addition, individuals have earned credentials in specific trade or inspection areas, enhancing staff versatility.

“ICC Certifications demonstrate a professional commitment to public safety, diverse knowledge of construction safety codes and a high level of self-initiative,” said Jewell. “Being professionally certified by the Code Council provides a nationally recognized credential that will only enhance the services provided to the citizens of Hartsville/Trousdale County.”

Jewell has earned seven ICC professional certifications include: ICC Certified Residential & Commercial Building Inspector, Residential & Commercial Plumbing Inspector, Residential and Commercial Mechanical Inspector, and Fire Inspector 1. These being qualifications to be State of Tennessee Certified Building, Plumbing, Mechanical and Fire Inspector, Jewell is now one of a few in the state with all certifications.

“Becoming Code Council-certified is a significant personal and professional accomplishment, and is a key step toward enhanced professional stature,” said ICC Board of Directors President Ronald Piester. “Code Council certificate holders demonstrate a confirmed commitment to public safety and building safe communities.” 

The International Code Council is a member-focused association. It is dedicated to developing model codes and standards used in the design, build and compliance process to construct safe, sustainable, affordable and resilient structures. Most U.S. Communities and many global markets choose the International Codes.

For more information, contact: Dwight Jewell, ICC and TN Certified Inspector at 615-374-1125 or htcinspector@gmail.com.

Fuller announces his candidacy for Criminal Court Judge

 

Assistant District Attorney Brian Fuller has announced that he is a candidate for Criminal Court Judge for the 15th Judicial District.  

The 15th Judicial District includes Trousdale, Macon, Smith, Jackson and Wilson Counties. The position is currently held by Judge David Durham who has decided to retire at the end of the term in 2014.  

Fuller has been an Assistant District Attorney for 17 years. After graduating from law school in 1996, he began his career as a prosecutor in the 28th Judicial District in West Tennessee, which includes Gibson, Crockett and Haywood Counties. After serving as an Assistant District Attorney in the 28th district for two years, he returned home to Wilson County in 1999 where he was appointed Assistant District Attorney for the 15th Judicial District by District Attorney General Tommy Thompson. Fuller has served in that position for the last 15 years.  

As a criminal prosecutor, Fuller has handled thousands of criminal cases in every court in the district. He has prosecuted cases in the General Sessions, Juvenile and Criminal Courts of each county.  

Fuller has handled all types of cases on behalf of the State of Tennessee against criminal defendants. He has tried numerous jury trials and obtained convictions against defendants for crimes such as aggravated robbery, murder, attempted murder and sale of illegal narcotics.

He has served as the Criminal Court docket manager for the District Attorney’s Office in both Smith County from 2002 to 2005 and Wilson County from 2005 to the present.  

“As docket manager in both Smith and Wilson Counties for the past 11 years, I feel I have the experience and knowledge required of the next Criminal Court Judge in order to step in on day one and do the job right,” said Fuller. “As a prosecutor, I have had the opportunity to work closely with our law enforcement agencies at every level. I know the dangers and difficulties faced by our officers on a daily basis.  

“I have provided assistance and guidance in investigations, drafted and reviewed search warrants, and worked with law enforcement, victims and witnesses in an effort to bring those accused of crimes to justice.”   

Fuller said, “In addition, I have been in a wonderful position to learn every day from people like District Attorney Tommy Thompson, Judge David Durham, Judge John Wootten and the late Judge J.O. Bond, as well as all of the other judges, prosecutors and attorneys with whom I have had the pleasure to work. No other candidate for this position will have more experience in the criminal court system.

“Over the last 17 years, I have also been uniquely positioned to see and understand where our criminal justice system can be improved,” added Fuller. “Our justice system is overloaded with cases. Time management and scheduling are vital to a smooth and efficient court system. The next Criminal Court Judge must be able to prioritize cases and move cases efficiently through the system in order to give all parties involved, including the defendants, the State and the victims, a fair and speedy trial. 

“A judge should be knowledgeable in the law, experienced in the court system and courteous to all who enter the courtroom. A judge should also be the gatekeeper of fairness not only for those accused of criminal offenses, but also, and just as importantly, for the victims of crime. A fair trial resulting in a conviction should end with swift and appropriate punishment. 

“Serving this same court almost exclusively for the last 11 years and with 17 years as a prosecutor, I have not only the knowledge of the laws required, but the experience, vision, and demeanor needed to be the next Criminal Court Judge. This district cannot afford a training period for the new judge to learn on the job.”

Fuller was born and raised in Wilson County. He graduated from Lebanon High School in 1989 where he served as student body president. He attended Tennessee Technological University where he graduated in 1993 with a Bachelor of Science degree in political science. Fuller graduated from The University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville in 1996. While in law school he completed an internship with the Criminal Division of the United States Attorney’s Office in Knoxville.

Fuller has been married to his wife, Jennifer, since 1999. They reside in Lebanon with their two sons, Braden, 11, a sixth grader at Winfree Bryant Middle School and Bryce, 9, a fourth grader at Castle Heights Elementary.  

Fuller is a 2001 graduate of Leadership Wilson. He is member of the Tennessee Bar Association and the Lebanon Wilson County Chamber of Commerce. He has been active for the last several years coaching his sons’ youth sports teams in the community including baseball, football and soccer.

“As a lifelong member of this community and someone who cares deeply about our justice system and the citizens that it affects, I believe I am the right person for this position,” said Fuller. “I have the experience, values, knowledge and demeanor to do this job the right way from day one. In addition, I pledge that I will do my best to try to improve our court system every day. I respectfully ask for your support and vote on Aug. 7, 2014, for Criminal Court Judge for the 15th Judicial District.” 

Countdown to Christmas

 

It’s official. Thanksgiving is over and the holiday shopping season is in high gear. While we shop for everyone on our list please take a moment to remember the true spirit of Christmas, even the smallest kindness is appreciated.

The community Christmas concert and reception, “A Christmas to Remember,” held on Sunday evening was a great way to kick off the holiday season. Wonderful music, smiling faces and lots of Christmas spirit were enjoyed by more than 150 people. I hope we can make this a yearly event!

I recently found a list for the 12 Days of Christmas Kindness and it included small things; donating items to the local food bank, buying Christmas gifts for a child in need, making Christmas treats for the mailman, garbage man, etc. You get the idea. Please make a difference today — you will be surprised how good it feels!

Another way to help is donating to Christmas for Kids and the Community Help Center. Christmas for Kids which will serve more than 200 local children ages 3 to 15 years this holiday season. Christmas for Kids provides help for Trousdale County children who might not otherwise have much of a Christmas celebration.

The Community Help Center is also in need of monetary, food, clothing and furniture donations to serve those in need in our county. For more information please contact the Help Center at 374-2904. Store hours are Monday and Thursday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

The Living History Museum will be celebrating the Christmas season! Volunteers are decorating the house and making it available for tours again this year. Individuals, organizations and church groups are welcome to schedule a time to tour the house, learn its history and enjoy hot cider and cookies. Please contact the chamber at 615-374-9243 to reserve your tour.

Citizens Bank will be hosting the St. Thomas Susan G. Komen Mobile Mammography Unit at the Bank for a repeat visit on Dec. 13. For more information please contact Tracy Belcher, Citizens Bank, at 615-374-2265. Mammograms are offered on a walk-up basis and financial assistance is available.

The Christmas Parade will be held on Saturday, Dec. 14, at 10 a.m. This year’s theme is Come Home for Christmas. To register for the parade contact Racheal Petty at 615-804-8945 or the chamber office at 615-374-9243. Candy is welcome at the parade but it must be handed out along the street. It’s shaping up to be another great parade with the Shriners, Snowbird and three Grand Marshals!

The awards presentation will take place on the courthouse steps immediately following the parade. We hope you’ll stay for the awards ceremony and enjoy free coffee and hot chocolate provided by the Chamber of Commerce. Food will also be available for purchase. Please contact the chamber at 615-374-9243 for more information.

The EAO Fundraiser will begin at 1 p.m. on Dec. 14 and feature concessions and vendors at the Trousdale County Elementary School.

Santa left ‘exotic’ items in early stockings

 

What better subject for our December series of articles than Christmas and how it was celebrated in the past?

The Historical Society is fortunate to have several notebooks full of personal recollections that local residents have written down. These firsthand accounts were usually written for family members, but they and their families have been good enough to share them with the society.

We also have, over the years, interviewed some of our older residents and we have those on file also.

The Historical Society is working with the County Building Committee and the newly created Trousdale County Public Records Commission to have a safe place to store all of these and other documents from our County’s past. We hope, over the next several months, to create an “archives” in a portion of the old Co-op Building on East Main Street in town.

But, let’s start with the pioneers who were the first people to celebrate Christmas in Middle Tennessee.

The pioneers didn’t set up Christmas trees in their homes, nor did they wrap presents in bright colored paper and bows to give to each other.

Most pioneer families probably didn’t know what day of the week it was, much less the day of the month. Every day was a work day and calendars were rare on the frontier.

It was only after the early settlements became more established that people started keeping track of the days of the week and what month they were in. When the first inhabitants began meeting in each other’s homes to worship, which would lead to the establishing of our first churches, the days of the week became more significant.

Christmas was strictly a religious holiday in the late 1700s when Hartsville was first settled. People saw it as a feast day and they did a little decorating by bringing evergreen branches into their homes. The singing of Christmas hymns was also popular.

By the early 1800s the celebration began to expand.

Depending on their ethnic background they might have hung stockings on the mantel or placed their empty shoes on the hearth.

And, the stockings they hung up were not the large fancy embroidered ones we use today…they were actual socks!

Brown Draper told an interviewer from the Vidette in the 1970s that his stocking on the mantel “was the real thing” and it was mostly filled with fruit and nuts, with “maybe a silver dollar in the toe.”

Another old account we have is from Virginia Winston Foley, recorded by her daughter Joanna. 

“…as we hung our stockings from the mantel (we) joked with our oldest sister that she had the smallest feet…next were two more stockings belonging to the in-between sisters and the last one hanging was mine. I won’t say what size it was, but it was nowhere near the smallest.”

By the way, everyone had a fireplace mantel back then because back then everyone heated with a fireplace!

“Miss Pearl” Price Thompson’s father would see the burning fire in the fireplace as a problem. In an interview she gave over 40 years ago she said, “(Daddy) would let the fire die down and cover the coals, so Santa wouldn’t burn his feet when he came down the chimney.” 

He would continue his ruse Christmas morning by pointing out tracks in the soot of the fireplace to Pearl and her sister, saying that was where Santa had landed.

Stockings were small and were not big enough to hold large toys or baby dolls and little tin horns. Instead children would get fruit and nuts and maybe some hard candy.

Today’s children will think that a piece of fruit or hard candy or some nuts would indicate a cheap Santa, but in the past fresh tropical fruits were a rarity. Nuts in the stockings were usually thin shelled English walnuts or Brazil nuts, not the types found locally and candy was always a treat.

Ruby Stone wrote down her stories of growing up and we quote from her, “…at Christmas we might get chocolate, coconut bonbons, delicate “honeycomb” in pastel colors of pink, yellow, white and green…we had stick candy to chew on…peppermint, lemon, horehound and licorice…we always had plenty of apples and pears, but oranges and bananas were a rarity…” 

Next week we look at Christmas trees! 

Keeping Christmas shopping local

 

Helping local shoppers buy in Trousdale and raising funds for their scholarship fund, EAO will be hosting its second annual Christmas Bazaar Dec. 14 at Trousdale County Elementary School from 12-5 p.m.

“This spring will be third anniversary for the EAO Foundation, and it will also be CJ, Jonathan and Elijah’s graduating class,” said Karissa Oldham. “This graduating class faced great tragedy three years ago, and grew from it. They mourned, but they also survived and thrived. Now they are graduating!

“Many with great plans to further their education, and EAO plans to give more scholarship money this year than it has in years past. 

Oldham added, “While we also raise a large portion of our monies for scholarships, EAO also supports other non-profit agencies like Christmas for Kids, Hartsville food bank and Vanderbilt’s Children Hospital.”

The second annual bazaar will have vendors from pampered chef, Van Loo’s Traveling Boutique, Scentsy, Mary Kay, 31, Paparazzi Jewelry, Silpada and those with craft items.

Oldham added there is no fee for both rental, if vendors give a percentage of their sales from the event of give a donation. For more information, call 615-969-9238.

On the Sam Beasley Road side of the elementary school, EAO will also be hosting a concession stand for Team Trousdale girls and boys basketball games. Entry fee for the games is $3.

“Our EAO and EAO juniors will be walking in the Christmas parade,” said Oldham. “Since most families will be out enjoying the day, we are hoping that they will continue to stay out and about, and come shop for a good cause!.”

EAO will host its annual street fair on the first Saturday in May.

Managing Editor Marie Corhern can be reached at 615-374-3556 or email mcorhern@hartsvillevidette.com.

The 14 weeks of football

 

It’s been a long season, but The Yellow Jackets have fought for the opportunity to play in the Championship game for 14 weeks. In honor of the guys, coaches, staff, family, friends and fans who have been with them through it all, I present “The 14 Weeks of Football…” [Bad rhythming the tune of “The 12 Days of Christmas”]

 

On the first week of football,

The Jackets gave to me

a hint of a golden trophy

 

On the second week of football,

The Jackets gave to me

two off weeks,

And a hint of a golden trophy

 

On the third week of football,

The Jackets gave to me

three ball girls,

two off weeks,

And a hint of a golden trophy

 

On the fourth week of football,

The Jackets gave to me

four coaches screaming, 

three ball girls,

two off weeks,

And a hint of a golden trophy

 

On the fifth week of football

The Jackets gave to me

five touchdowns,

four coaches screaming,

three ball girls,

two off weeks,

And a hint of a golden trophy

 

On the sixth week of football

The Jackets gave to me

six flags a-flying, 

five touchdowns,

four coaches screaming,

three ball girls,

two off weeks,

And a hint of a golden trophy

 

On the seventh week of football

The Jackets gave to me,

seven zombies wondering,

six flags a-flying,

five touchdowns,

four coaches screaming,

three ball girls,

two off weeks,

And a hint of a golden trophy

 

On the eighth week of football

The Jackets gave to me,

eight cheerleaders dancing,

seven zombies wondering,

six flags a-flying,

five touchdowns,

four coaches screaming,

three ball girls,

two off weeks,

And a hint of a golden trophy

 

On the tenth week of football

The Jackets gave to me

ten Commanders crying,

eight cheerleaders dancing,

seven zombies wondering,

six flags a-flying,

five touchdowns,

four coaches screaming,

three ball girls,

two off weeks,

And a hint of a golden trophy

 

On the twelfth week of football

The Jackets gave to me 

twelve Cougars packing,

ten Commanders crying,

eight cheerleaders dancing,

seven zombies wondering

six flags a-flying,

five touchdowns,

four coaches screaming,

three ball girls,

two off weeks,

And a hint of a golden trophy

 

On the thirteenth week of football

The Jackets gave to me

thirteen fans a-freezing

twelve Cougars packing,

ten Commanders crying,

eight cheerleaders dancing,

seven zombies wondering

six flags a-flying,

five touchdowns,

four coaches screaming,

three ball girls,

two off weeks,

And a hint of a golden trophy

 

On the fourteenth week of football

The Jackets gave to me

fourteen plays a-running

thirteen fans a-freezing

twelve Cougars packing,

ten Commanders crying,

eight cheerleaders dancing,

seven zombies wondering

six flags a-flying,

five touchdowns,

four coaches screaming,

three ball girls,

two off weeks,

And a hint of a golden trophy…

 

Good Luck to The Jackets this week, and hopefully bring the tenth State Title to The Creekbank!

Relay for Life kicks off fundraising with more than $2,000

 

Trousdale County’s Relay for Life group held it’s second annual chili supper and cake walk on Saturday, Nov. 16, at Jim B Satterfild Middle School in order to raise money and awareness for cancer patients in the area.

“If we do hear about someone in the community we try and contact them,” said head of Trousdale County Relay for Life group Stephanie Dennis. “We have a support group that meets up at the hospital. Having someone to talk to can really make all the difference.”

The cost for the chili supper was $5. The cake walk was a huge success with several donations of deserts from the community.

The group raised $2,164.52 for its efforts at the annual fundraiser.

There was also a silent auction with items ranging from coffee mugs to furniture that were contributed by various attendees. 

Dennis added, “[They did] An awesome job at the chili supper and cake walk. Thanks so much for all participates help!”

All proceeds from the silent auction, chili supper and cake walk go towards helping cancer patients get the help and support they need.

“We’re glad everyone came out,” said Dennis “Everyone showed their support and had a lot of fun.”

Managing Editor Marie Corhern contributed to this report.

Hartsville Vidette Intern can be reached at 615-374-3556 or email mcorhern@hartsvillevidette.com.

Civic organizations take root in Hartsville

 

With last week’s Rotary Club “Hartsville Follies” now just a memory, although some of the jokes are still being repeated here and there, we thought this might be a good time to look at the history of Hartsville’s civic organizations.

We start with this quote from a 1947 Vidette, “Hartsville is the most ‘organized’ town in existence. Among the civic, social, and religious clubs are the Trousdale Club, Young Farmers and Homemakers, Lions Club, Kiwanis Club, Civic League, American Legion, VFW, two young ladies circles, a business and professional women’s circle, two or more missionary societies, the Farm Bureau, Home Demonstration Clubs, Ladies Auxiliary of the VFW, and other clubs.”

That is impressive indeed.

What is even more impressive is that in 1947 at least one Hartsville organization had been meeting for over 100 years!

Hartsville Masonic Lodge No 113 of Free and Accepted Masons was organized here in 1845!

At that original meeting, the “Worshipful Master” was Humphrey Bate. Bate lived in the Castalian Springs area in Sumner County, but in 1845 we were also part of Sumner County. 

If Humphrey Bate’s name sounds familiar it may be because his son, also named Humphrey Bate, was not only a practicing physician but a musician and one of the original stars of the Grand Old Opry!

We are fortunate to have the minutes of the lodge’s early years on microfilm at our local library. The lodge, which is still going strong today, had several of our town’s leading citizens at that first meeting. Listed in the minutes are: Thomas Stalker, E. T. Seay, Paschal Head, S. H. Lauderdale and Thomas Paterson.

The first order of business was “the former bylaws of King Hirams with suitable alterations and amendments were adopted for the present government of the lodge.”

The Masonic organization is quite ancient and dates back to King Solomon’s Temple when a “mason” was a person who carved and set stone into place. During the Middle Ages masons were considered at the top of the construction trade. Because they were not indentured the term “free mason” was sometimes used.

In the mid 1700s the organization we know today was set up and given rules and rituals. It was no longer restricted to actual stone masons, and was created with the intent of being a positive force in a community, doing good and helping widows and orphans, particularly those of deceased members.

As a “fraternal” group it was limited to males only. Today, however, it has a ladies’ auxiliary and even has affiliate groups for teens.

Within the organization, members can advance and achieve ranks or “degrees.” Members are sometimes called “Shriners.”

But, back to our local lodge!

In the earliest years of our state, the organization was looked upon with some suspicion by churches. In the minutes of a local Baptist church we find this notation: “…July, 1800, Query: Shall a member remain in fellowship who joins himself to a Masonic Society…(or) associates with them at their lodge? Answer, No.”

With time the organization was recognized as the benevolent group that it is and opposition to the group was dropped.

If we continue our look at the minutes from those early years we find that the group established Hartsville’s first public library. 

“March 9, 1850,…moved and carried that a committee be appointed to collect the floating library of the town and deposit in the hall. “

Later, on April 13, 1850, we find this, “Bothers Kindred, Dyer, and Burnette were appointed to take up a collection for the purpose of furnishing a book case to hold the library.”

More next week!

• A reminder, the Historical Society will meet this Saturday, Nov. 9, at the Vaught Public Library at 2 p.m. Our speaker will be Professor Mark Cheatham, from Cumberland University who is an authority and author of a book on Andrew Jackson and will speak on Jackson and his role in Tennessee history. Visitors are welcome at all Historical Society meetings.

More than 30 entries in Veterans Day Parade

 

Its a day to honor all veterans, and Trousdale will be doing it in style. 

This year’s celebration will feature a memorial service, a parade and events at Hartsville City Park Saturday.

The parade will be at 4 p.m., with a memorial ceremony preceding it at 3 p.m. at the Veterans Memorial Wall. The parade route will be the same as the Christmas parade.

This year’s parade will feature 34 floats, cars and organizations. Grand Marshals for the parade will be Bill Holder and Lloyd Celsor, both World War II veterans. Celsor is also the oldest surviving veteran in Trousdale County.

Lineup as of Monday was as follows:

1. Sheriff Ray Russell

2. Gordonsville color guard

3. Grand Marshals Celsor and Holder

4. Master of Ceremonies Amber Russell

5-6. County Line band

7-8. Bates Ford

9. Ooh la la Cakes

10. Trousdale County FCA

11. Trees 2 Treasures

12-15. Trousdale County Fire Department

16. Miss Trousdale County and court

17-18. Brandon Powell

19-41. classic cars

42-46. Trousdale County Marching Band

47-48. Gordonsville National Guard

49. Lonnie Kemp

50-51. Chamber of Commerce

52. Ms. Shockley

53. Fair pageant winners

54-57. Shriners

58. Trousdale County EMS

59. Gallatin National Guard

60-61. Pro-Med Ambulance Service

62-63. American Legion

64. Cash Express

65. Macon County Veterans Office

66. Phillip Snow

67-68. Macon County Fire Department

69. Boy Scout Pack #900

70-71. Jordan/Stetson White

72-78. Old Time Express

79. Life Care Ambulance Service

80. Greg Carson

81. Hartsville VFW

Parade lineup will begin at 3 p.m.

Following the parade, various booths will be set up featuring hair bows, crafts, details for cars, wedding decorations and Tupperware, added Amber Russell. The band County Line will also be performing.

The Blackhawk that was previously scheduled will not be able to attend this year’s event.

Russell said, “The day has been created to celebrate those of the VFW, American Legion and all veterans. Not just here, but all over the United States and abroad.”

The ceremony before the parade will feature a performance of “Taps,” Rep. Terri Lynn Weaver will sing and there will be a small presentation to “remember how much some gave all to keep us free,” added Russell.

For more information, contact Russell at 615-680-4799 or visit the parade’s Facebook page.

Managing Editor Marie Corhern can be reached at 615-374-3556 or email thevidette@bellsouth.net.

Follies hit record numbers

 

It could be due to a number of reasons – new script, longer run time or just good timing – but everyone agreed that the 2013 Hartsville Rotary Follies was the best yet.

“Attendance numbers are higher than last year, even on the first night,” said Director Sam Holder. “This year’s show was well done, and people seemed delighted with the performances.”

This year’s follies brought out attendance highs to the Eleanor Ford Theatre at Trousdale County High School. The number of tickets sold for all three were 238 for Oct. 25, 139 for Oct. 26 and 137 for Oct. 27.

“The audience was wanting to be entertained, and they got that with all the outstanding talent we have from a small town,” added Holder.

The club so far has raised $3,328 during the follies for the club’s scholarship program.

“The show went really well, and lots of people came out,” said Dwayne Byrd, president of the Hartsville Rotary Club. “We had good support from the community, and we thank everyone that helped us with this production.”

This year’s cast included: Tim Roberson, Linda Case, Regina White, Jerry Richmond, Jake West, Kim Wrinkle, Charlie Steiger, Jerry Ford, Hattie McDonald, Pat Langford, Bill Painter, Eleanor Ford, Marie Corhern, Dwight Jewell, Andy Jellison, Dave Traini, Dewayne Byrd, Scott Morrell, Seth Blankenship, James Chambers, Hannah Gregory, Ashley Cornwell, Destiny Dixon, Angela Traini Crutcher and Hannah Beach.

Musical guests included: County Line Band featuring Ethan Blair, David Jellison, Will Scruggs and Ben McAnelly; Dr. Bien Samson; Hannah Beach; Jake West; Tim Roberson and Kim Wrinkle; Angela Traini Crutcher; Woodard Family featuring Jeffery, Edna, Chad, Benny and Robert McClanahan; Dave Traini; Jerry Mungle; Shelley Baker; Eleanor Ford; Rep. Terri Lynn Weaver; Clark Bourque; Andy Jellison; Tia Hix; and Hartsville Dance Studio’s Braylee Potts and Niera Woodmore under the guidance of Natalie Rose Klein.

The club received behind-the-scene assistance from TCHS Interact Club and other members of the Rotary Club.

Holder and Byrd wanted to thank the following the people and businesses for their help in the 2013 Follies: Clint Satterfield; Teresa Dickerson; Vicki Thaxton; Dan Dickerson and his classes; Stacey Dickerson and TCHS Interact Club; Macon-Trousdale Farmers Co-op; G & L Garden Center; Hartsville Printing; Trousdale Bank & Trust; Citizens Bank; Henry Case; John and Lynn Oliver; Hartsville Cabinet & Millworks and employees; and Natalie Klein and the Hartsville Dance Studio.

Managing Editor Marie Corhern can be reached at 615-374-3556 or email thevidette@bellsouth.net.

2013 Petals and Pearls

 

Young girls, along with their mothers or mentors, participated in various activities during the third annual Petals and Pearls event Oct. 29 at the Hartsville United Methodist Church. The event was hosted by Trousdale County Health Council.