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Haley’s Hearts 5K scheduled for Oct. 5

The Haley’s Hearts Foundation is planning its ninth annual Haley’s Hearts Forever 5K Run/Walk on Saturday, Oct. 5.

Pre-registration for the fundraising event is under way and ends on Friday, Sept. 20. The pre-registration cost is $20 for adults, $20 for youth and $10 for toddlers, according to the event’s Facebook page. Entrants will receive a T-shirt.

Race day registration will begin at 7 a.m., with the race scheduled to start at 9 a.m. in Hartsville City Park. Registration on race day will be $25.

Get the rest of the story by picking up this week’s Hartsville Vidette!

TWRA plans local hunter safety courses

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency will be conducting a two-day Hunter Education course for students in Trousdale County next month.

The class will be held on Friday, Oct. 4 from 5:30-9:30 p.m. and Saturday, Oct. 5 from 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. in the Ag Pavilion at Trousdale County High School.

Get the rest of the story by picking up this week’s Hartsville Vidette!

IMPACThought: Don’t be overburdened by ‘light affliction’

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Jon Shonebarger

“For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal
weight of glory; While we look not at the things which are seen: for the things which are seen are temporal: but the things which are not seen are eternal.” (2 Corinthians 4:17-18 KJV)

The veteran missionary apostle, Paul, shared an encouraging reminder to his beloved brothers and sisters in Corinth that puts our earthly journey in perspective. Our affairs of life are temporary. Difficulties will come to pass. Nothing is permanent. Our lives on this earth are as the morning fog that appears for a short time and soon passes away. Our life is but a moment in the sea of time.

Get the rest of the story by picking up this week’s Hartsville Vidette!

Chamber News: Coming up with plan for Hartsville’s future

Natalie Knudsen

As our community grows through housing starts and new residents, Hartsville is at a crossroads. We can continue as we are without a real vision for our community or we can develop a workable plan. This doesn’t mean we need to become a Gallatin or Lebanon, but we can set our sights on becoming the prettiest, most friendly town in Middle Tennessee.

If you’d like to make a difference in the appearance and promotion of our community, please make plans to attend these upcoming meetings. They are open to everyone – not just Chamber members.

Get the rest of the story by picking up this week’s Hartsville Vidette!

Look Back: More on Bill Rickman’s WWII flight

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Bill Rickman is shown here on his return visit to Belgium, alongside one of the families that witnessed his dramatic plane crash during World War II.

Last week we read Bill Rickman’s firsthand account of his exploits in World War II, which included his plane being shot down by German guns! This week, we finish his harrowing tale:

“As I bailed, I counted to one, not ten, and pulled the ripcord. I didn’t want any part of counting all the way to ten. For some reason, I had chosen to wear a harness with a clip-on chute that had only a 22-foot canopy. That meant I had more freedom to maneuver in the air but less time to do it before hitting the ground.

My parachute harness wasn’t cinched up tight enough and when I bailed out my crouch got hung up… it was a long ride down with that discomfort!

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Jack McCall: The simple beauty behind a tobacco leaf

I’ve seen some beautiful sights in my time. Many of them take me back to my formative years – a set of mama cows with their calves out in lush spring pasture, rows of square bales of hay lined up across a hay field, dark green corn fields in full tassel and a patch of tobacco, yellow as a pumpkin, ready to be cut.

Across the Miles
Jack McCall

And I have always considered a tobacco leaf a beautiful thing. Maybe it is because tobacco played such a major role in the early years of my life. Tobacco put food on our table, clothes on our backs and a roof over our heads. Tobacco made it possible for my brothers, my sister and me to attend college.

I learned how to work hard in a tobacco patch. And I learned about perseverance there – you finished the job even if you were exhausted, and you came back the next day whether you felt like it or not. Raising a crop of tobacco is where my father taught me to take pride in the quality of my work. To me, a tobacco leaf is a beautiful thing.

Get the rest of the story by picking up this week’s Hartsville Vidette!

IMPACThought: Live your faith through Jesus’ example of love

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Jon Shonebarger

Of all of the laws, commandments and precepts in the Old Testament of Scripture, Jesus declared there were two in particular that summarized the entire message of the prophets.

Answering a lawyer who asked what the great commandments were, Jesus stated, ”Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind.”

He continued by say, “The second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.” (Matthew 22:37-40).

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Chamber News: Learn about county through Leadership Trousdale

The next class for the Leadership Trousdale program is taking applications and will hold its orientation meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 17 at 4 p.m. at the courthouse.

The Leadership Trousdale program is designed to take an in-depth look at the people, places and organizations that support our city and county.

Get the rest of the story by picking up this week’s Hartsville Vidette!

Congressman Rose’s staffers plan Hartsville office hours

The staff of Congressman John Rose (TN-6) will be in Hartsville on the second Wednesday of each month to meet with local citizens who need assistance with federal services.

John Rose

“I am thrilled to have a talented district staff serving the good folks of Tennessee’s Sixth District. We are focused on providing top-notch constituent services for all 19 counties,” said Rose in a press statement. “Knowing that at times it may be difficult to travel to one of our two district offices, I have directed my district staff to periodically set up office hours in other locations throughout our 19-county district. This will allow everyone in the Sixth District to have face-to-face access to my district staff and the services we provide.”

“The next opportunity for constituents to take advantage of these remote office hours will be in Trousdale County,” Rose announced. “My staff will be meeting with constituents at the Hartsville/Trousdale County Administration Building on Wednesday, Sept. 11 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Constituents who do not need a face-to-face meeting may call the Gallatin office to discuss any questions at 615-206-8204.”

Rose represents Tennessee’s Sixth Congressional District and resides in Cookeville with his wife, Chelsea, and their son, Guy. The Sixth District includes Cannon, Clay, Coffee, Cumberland, DeKalb, Fentress, Jackson, Macon, Overton, Pickett, Putnam, Robertson, Smith, Sumner, Trousdale, White, and Wilson counties as well as portions of Cheatham and Van Buren counties.

Hartsville library celebrates Summer Reading Program

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Summer Reading activities from June through August meant another season of fun at the Fred A. Vaught Public Library!

This year’s national theme was “Space,” to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Libraries across the country held star-themed parties, shared NASA kits, and taught people of all ages about where we’ve been and where we’re going with our space program.

Congratulations to our grand-prize winners: Rylee Butler, Delsin Urick, and Helena Paxton!

We’d like to give a huge thank you to our sponsors and contributors: Tri-County Electric, Hartsville Piggly Wiggly, Hartsville Foodland, Citizens Bank, Wilson Bank & Trust, Trousdale County Trustee Cindy Carman, Hartsville City Pool, Regina Waller, Martha Joe Jewell, library board and staff, and all who donated in some way.

We also want to thank our performers and volunteers: Pet Partners Tashi, Space Ambassador Janet Ivey, reader Robin Gregory, NHECM Animals, entertainer Scott Tripp, reader Janice Sloan, Hydro Jenna of Mr. Bond’s Science Guys, Runaway Puppet Theater, and the Knudsen family’s mini horses.

What an “out of this world” space-themed summer we’ve had with a universe of stories!

Look Back: One man’s recollection of WWII shootdown

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Bill Rickman was only 19 years old when he enlisted to fight in World War II and just 21 when he flew over Germany on his fateful bombing raid!

When researching the past, it is always great to have a ‘first-person’ account. That is, when a person writes about his or her experiences growing up, or traveling, serving in a war or being part of any historical event.

We have few firsthand accounts from our past, but we do have some and they will be the focus of this month’s articles.

Our first such memoir is that of the late Bill Rickman, who served in World War II as a pilot and was shot down by German anti-aircraft fire (called ‘flak’). He wrote about that experience for a book published in 2008. The title of the book is “Flying Flak Alley” and refers to the narrow flight pattern for Allied bombers as they flew from their bases in England to drop bombs on Germany. The book is a collection of firsthand recollections of those bombing raids.

Get the rest of the story in this week’s Hartsville Vidette!

Jack McCall: Tennessee hills, waters remain special places

Across the Miles
Jack McCall

As I took in the scene of the rolling Tennessee hills, I could see a bend in the Cumberland River in the distance. Alone with my thoughts, I was reminded of my love for these Tennessee hills. They have been my home for over half a century.

Among them I found my roots in the woods, rivers, creeks, tobacco patches, and hay fields. Surrounded by them I have traveled highways, gravel roads, dirt roads, and cattle paths. For decades I have enjoyed the splendor showcased by these hills with the changing of each season. I have lived to know this old saying is true: “You can take the boy out of the country, but you can’t take the country out of the boy.”

Get the rest of the story in this week’s Hartsville Vidette!

IMPACThought: Let your faith generate mighty works

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Jon Shonebarger

The opportunity to behold Jesus, by God’s grace, was substantially greater for Nazareth than any other city in the land of Israel. They denied the revelation of God’s word preached by the Word of God Himself! They refused to put their faith in Him as their Savior.

As a result of their unbelief, the Scripture declares that no mighty work could be accomplished there, with the exception of a few minor healings. It is profoundly important for latter-day believers to comprehend this significant spiritual truth: it is faith in Christ that generates miracles and answers to prayer. It’s faith that generates mighty works of God.

Get the rest of the story in this week’s Hartsville Vidette!

Hartsville Masonic Lodge inducts new member

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On Monday, August 26, Hartsville Lodge #113, Free & Accepted Masons, initiated Bro. Andrew Dean Mullins II into the first degree of Freemasonry.

Twenty Masons representing nine different lodges were in attendance.

Pictured are the attendees to the degree along with Bro. Kelan Lee, Worshipful Master of Hartsville #113, and new initiate, Bro. Drew Mullins.

Hartsville United Methodist to hold ‘Pig Roast & Auction’

Hartsville’s United Methodist Church will be holding its inaugural “Hog Wild” Pig Roast & Auction on Saturday, Sept. 7 as a fundraiser for church activities.

The event will run from 3-6 p.m. on the church lawn at 224 River Street and will have barbecue available by the plate or by the pound.

Get the rest of the story in this week’s Hartsville Vidette!

Look Back: Hartsville man linked to fight for women’s suffrage

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The women of Tennessee took to the streets to demonstrate for the right to vote in the early 1900s – and a Hartsville resident had a big part in their eventual victory.

We finish this month’s article on recent acquisitions to our Historical Society archives with a newspaper clipping from 1945 and the celebration of women’s suffrage, which will next year have its 100th anniversary.

The faded, yellowing newspaper clipping is an obituary for J.D. McMurry, a local lawyer with family ties that go way back in our local history.

McMurry was a lawyer, as his father before him had been.

Jack McCall: Day-old bread toasted with a mother’s love

Across the Miles
Jack McCall

I’m not sure when I was first introduced to day-old bread.

Sometime in the early- to mid-1960s my mother discovered Kern’s Bread Thrift Shop in Cookeville. That’s when she began to take an occasional trip to Cookeville to purchase day-old bread. Back in those days, that was considered a rather long trip by motor vehicle.

When my mother purchased day-old bread, she didn’t buy a loaf or two or three. She bought a carload. She would let down both back seats in our 1961 Chevrolet Parkwood station wagon and fill up the back with bread.

Get the rest of the story in this week’s Hartsville Vidette!

Learn about Trousdale County through Chamber of Commerce

Natalie Knudsen

Please make plans to join us at the September Community Chamber of Commerce meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 3, at the Community Center, located at 301 E. Main Street.

Our speakers will be Patti and Gill Carter. Patti and Gill are new to the area with their Crossroads Mission Care, which provides counseling, resources and connections for missions and missionaries around the world as well as local fire, police and first responders. They have an interesting story to share.

Get the rest of the story in this week’s Hartsville Vidette!

IMPACThought: Even faithful need time for ‘self-care’

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Jon Shonebarger

The apostles of Jesus had just returned from their first preaching tour. They were extremely anxious to report the results of their ministry coupled with all that they had seen and heard. It had been a genuine adventure as servants of their Lord and Savior. As novices to the ministry, there was much for them to receive feedback on, as well as asking about things they had never experienced before. Realize, they were being trained by the greatest Teacher of them all! It was a mission’s trip that challenged them spiritually, emotionally and physically. It was now time to sit down with Jesus and talk.

Knowing of their need to debrief their mission’s work, as well as eat, Jesus called them apart from the crowd. (Mark 6:30-31 KJV). “And the apostles gathered themselves together unto Jesus, and told him all things, both what they had done, and what they had taught. And he said unto them, Come ye yourselves apart into a desert place, and rest a while: for there were many coming and going, and they had no leisure so much as to eat.”

Get the rest of the story in this week’s Hartsville Vidette!